HVAC Information

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Best HVAC Trade Schools in Tennessee: Air Conditioning Training

The HVAC industry is one of the largest, steadiest, and fastest-growing technical industries in the country. Becoming an HVAC technician in Tennessee is one of the best career moves you can make right now.

It all starts with the best HVAC school. This article will cover the best HVAC schools for you, show you what to look for when choosing the school, and give you everything you need to learn how to become a well educated, highly qualified technician.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Tennessee

For certification purposes, Tennessee doesn’t require technicians to hold any specific certifications. However, the EPA does require that anyone working with refrigeration holds the EPA 608 certification.

The 608 certification has four types (Type I, II, III, and Universal), and the exam must be taken in a specific time, monitored by a certified proctor, and done in person.

For those wishing to start their own business or hold a contractor’s license, Tennessee requires the CMC certification in the field you want to contract for. Each exam is separate and required a 70% passing grade or higher. You must also hold 3 years experience in the field for the exam type you are taking.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

Becoming an HVAC technician in Tennessee is a straightforward process. In fact, the only requirement is that you obtain your EPA 608 certification. Once you have this, you are free to begin applying for jobs.

However, if you are looking for a career, you may want to pursue the longer, more established method of gaining employment. The first step of which is to hold your high school diploma or GED.

Next, you should attend an HVAC school. This can be a trade school offering prep for the certification exams (or one that includes them), or you can attend a college or university if you wish to obtain an HVAC degree.

Using your post-grad programs to get field experience with an internship or apprenticeship should be your next goal. During this time, you can take your exams for the EPA 608 certification, NATE, or HVAC Excellence.

After these steps (which should take between 12 months and 4 years), you will have training, education, certification, and real-world experience. Everything a potential employer is looking for will already be obtained, and you can start your new career off on the right foot.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Below you will find several consideration factors for choosing the right school. Most of these are logical but often overlooked. Make sure you think of as many factors as possible when making your final decision.

Location

The physical location of your school is important. You will want a campus that is close to you, but you also want to consider where you will be when class time draws near.

For example, if you choose a school because it is close to home, but you work further away, you may want to instead choose a campus closer to work. Don’t forget to account for things such as time of class and the resulting traffic around the campus at that time.

Accredited School

School accreditation is a process of the school proving to the governing bodies that they offer a level of education and student standards that meets or exceeds minimum qualifications.

While this isn’t the litmus test to determine how good a school is, it does mean that you will have a diploma or degree that is worth something down the road. Non-accredited schools usually don’t offer anything to potential employers.

If you plan to continue your education and head for a higher degree, non-accredited credits won’t transfer, resulting in a loss of time and money.

Offers Quality Education

Quality education comes in many forms. You should always visit the campus before enrollment and talk to faculty, instructors, and current students. Try to get a feel of how well you will fit in as well as what the school does to teach their students.

This can include things like lab time (see below) but also extends to the HVAC books used as well as the HVAC software. You also should account for the atmosphere and the gut-feeling you have while on campus.

Offers Hands-on Training

Hands-on training, or lab hours, is one of the most important aspects of HVAC training there is. With hands-on educations, you get to know the systems, tools, and equipment used daily by technicians.

This knowledge is more valuable than what you learn in the classroom (not to ignore classroom studies). You should make sure that your chosen school offers plenty of lab hours to take the most advantage of the learning.

Connects You to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Post-grad programs help you get placed in apprenticeships, internships, and job interviews. This resource is free and usually lasts for the life of the graduate.

You will want the connections and assistance the school has built up with companies and organizations over the years. Make sure you take full advantage of them. Start by making sure the school offers these programs.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Customer service is a skill set that every technician needs. It isn’t challenging to learn, but if you don’t have any prior customer service training, you should ensure that the school offers at least one portion of the course devoted to customer service.

6 Best HVAC Schools in Tennessee

Below you will find the best HVAC schools in Tennessee. Each is reviewed and compared to give you a better idea of what they offer and the important aspects of the schools. Scroll through and find your ideal HVAC training center.

1. Fortis Institute
Address: 3354 Perimeter Hill Dr #105, Nashville, TN 37211

Best Choice For: Certification preparations

Fortis CollegeFortis Institute has campuses all over the country, and the Nashville campus is one of the best. You will get a full education with plenty of lab hours and one-on-one training due to smaller class sizes.

The course completes with you able to enter the workforce ready to go. The exam prep is among the best in the country, and you will have no problem taking or passing your EPA certifications or any other certification you decide to pursue.

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2. Lincoln College of Technology
Address: 1524 Gallatin Ave, Nashville, TN 37206

Best Choice For: All-inclusive HVAC education

Lincoln College of TechnologyLincoln College of Technology is another country-wide school that has campuses all over North America. They also offer room and board for out-of-state students. The courses are intense and hands-on, which is exactly what you may need.

With instructors that know the filed with years of experience, you will learn at an accelerated rate, giving you confidence in and knowledge of the trade. The lab hours are some of the longest in the state, which provides you with plenty of hands-on training with today’s leading HVAC systems.

3. Moore Tech
Address: 1200 Poplar Ave, Memphis, TN 38104

Best Choice For: Multiple degrees or certification options

Moore TechMoore Tech offers two courses to fit your schedule and needs. Both courses are 2-year courses completed either in the day time or at night. The day course will end with either a diploma or an associate’s degree. Meanwhile, the night course is a 2-year certification course.

The labs are state of the art and feature today’s leading manufacturers. You will get plenty of hands-on training and classroom work on theory, mechanics, diagnostics, tool usage, installation, and repair. Credits will also transfer to most Tennessee colleges for those wishing to continue their education.

4. Remington College – Memphis Campus
Address: 2710 Nonconnah Blvd, Memphis, TN 38132

Best Choice For: Total HVAC training coverage

Remington College offers an HVAC associate’s degree program that is geared towards the commercial sector. If you wish to learn about residential and commercial HVAC applications, this is the course for you. The 2-year program focuses on electrical theory, future technologies, and current systems.

The hands-on lab work is overseen by some of the most influential professionals in the industry. You also get plenty of classwork to cover all the HVAC essentials needed in today’s marketplace. This includes customer service and vendor communications.

5. Total Tech LLC
Address: 909 Murfreesboro Pike, Nashville, TN 37217

Best Choice For: Hands-on learning with HVAC theory

Total Tech LLCTotal Tech focuses on a technician view-point learning metric. You start in the class, cover the theory and application of the lesson, and move to the lab to practice live systems and cover what was learned in the books. This process is repeated for each lesson giving the tech a firm grasp on the concept as well as the application.

Each student here is treated as if they were the only one in the class. With plenty of real-world applications, hands-on training, and instructor-led lab assignments, the education is thorough, complete, and easy to digest.

Best Choice For: Campus selection

TCAT Colleges in TennesseeTennessee College of Applied Technology (TCAT) is a state-wide curriculum covering every aspect of HVAC education. Form entry-level learning to continuing education certification, the TCAT school tree is thorough, well rounded, and intense.

You will learn theory, installation, diagnostics, future technologies, customer service, and practical application. The best part is that there are plenty of TCAT campuses for you to choose from. Each campus offers the same courses and covers the same learning experience. You won’t have to travel far to get started in your new career.

Campuses:

Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Springfield)
Address: 104 W 7th Ave, Springfield, TN 37172
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Nashville)
Address: 100 White Bridge Pike, Nashville, TN 37205
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Knoxville)
Address: 1100 Liberty St, Knoxville, TN 37919
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Covington)
Address: 1600 US-51, Covington, TN 38019
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Memphis)
Address: 3435 Tchulahoma Rd, Memphis, TN 38118
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Athens)
Address: 1635 Vo-Tech Dr, Athens, TN 37303
Tennessee College of Applied Technology (Jackson)
Address: 2468 Technology Center Dr, Jackson, TN 38301

HVAC Training School Costs in Tennessee

The cost of tuition has a lot of variables. Knowing if you are getting a good deal or not will require some research and comparison shopping. In Tennessee, though, you can expect fees slightly higher than the national average. Financial aid is available for most.

Trade schools generally offer a single-cost tuition fee. This fee can range from about $1,250 to $9,000. The determining factors are the length of the course, what is included (room and board, books, software, tools, etc.), and whether certification exams are covered.

If you are searching for a degree, you will need to pay for the credit-hours required by the school to obtain the degree. Sometimes the schools will accept credits earned earlier, cutting down on your school time and cost.

You also have to account for the fee ranges between resident and non-resident statuses. On average, though, a degree will range from $25,000 to $45,000. It also depends on if you are after an associate’s (2-year) degree or a bachelor’s (4-year degree).

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Tennessee?

According to the BLS, HVAC is an industry with an expected 13% growth rate over the next 10 years. This means that there are plenty of current jobs open, and more are on the way. It is one of the highest-rated industries in the country.

Tennessee Entry Level HVAC Salary

For entry-level technicians with little to no experience, you can expect your starting wages to be competitive. Tennessee offers excellent starting wages, which average about $13 to $19 per hour, as reported by CareerExplorer.com.

This will also depend on your level of education and the size of the company that hires you. Because education is such an important factor for entry-level techs, the right school is a crucial decision.

Tennessee HVAC Tech Salary

For more experienced technicians (those with 5+ years of on-the-job experience), your wages begin to enter the 75th percentile. According to GlassDoor.com, this means annual salaries between $37,000 and $58,000.

The 90th percentile technicians report earnings as high as $68,000 per year, along with bonuses, overtime, and other benefits also included.

Return on Investment

The national average time to repay your debts for tuition, career costs, tools, and other fees is between 15 and 25 years. Tennessee is about average with most single persons, living on their own, reporting a full payback within 14 to 16 years.

While other states have a higher ROI, the wages and bonuses offered to HVAC technicians in Tennessee are slightly above average, meaning you can pay off your debt while living a more comfortable life.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Tennessee

The current market for entry-level as well as experienced technicians is relatively open. With over 400 current listings on Indeed.com, the industry state-wide is open and booming. The demand is going to increase in the industry as well.

With an expected growth of over 40,000 jobs per year and newer technologies pushing the industry forward, techs with the future tech knowledge will be in high demand.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How long does HVAC certification take to complete?

Certification in Tennessee boils down to how much you want to achieve. The minimum is the EPA 608 certification, which is a three hour exam and can be taken at any time for only the exam fee. There are several other certifications you can obtain, including NATE, HVAC Excellence, and EPA R-410a. All combined, these certifications can take a few months to several years to complete.

How much does an HVAC license cost?

Once you meet the minimum qualifications to obtain the HVAC license, you will only need to pay for the license exam, which costs $50. The cost of training, apprenticeships, and tuition are not included in that cost.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

You can study for your certifications online. There are also many schools switching to a hybrid format where the classroom portion is done online. However, you are still required to attend lab portions in person and be present when taking the certification exams.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

You can begin a career in HVAC within Tennessee without any prior experience or education. It isn’t advised as there aren’t a lot of positions that take new employees without some form of education or prior experience. However, the positions that are available don’t pay the best and may not be an optimal experience for furthering your career.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Tennessee?

There are plenty of HVAC apprenticeship and internship opportunities available in Tennessee. Your best option is to use the post-grad programs from your school. If you wish to go it alone, you can look for opportunities through the Tennessee Labor and Workforce website.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

There are two degrees you can obtain in the HVAC industry. The 2-year associate’s degree is the most common. However, for those looking to start their own company or expand their education to the maximum can also achieve the 4-year bachelor’s degree.

How do I get an HVAC job in Tennessee?

To get a job in the HVAC industry in Tennessee, you need to first obtain the EPA 608 certification. This is the only state-mandated requirement. However, employers are looking for those with experience, training, and education in the HVAC industry. Going through a trade school and an apprenticeship or college degree program are your best options for gaining a full-time position.

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Conclusion

HVAC training is an intensive course that requires hands-on training, learning about electrical theory, future technological advances, and systems in general. The right school will give you the best chance of finding a suitable position in this growing field.

This article has shown you the best HVAC schools in Tennessee, along with several consideration factors and other points of interest to help you make a well informed and conclusive decision.

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HVAC Apprenticeships: Complete Guide To Programs Near You

There’s no question about it – working hands-on is one of the best ways to learn any trade skills. This is even true of the HVAC industry, which remains a lucrative line of work for folks who like a lot of variety in their day to day work. But as you might expect, becoming an HVAC technician isn’t a straightforward task. In most cases, you must start as an HVAC apprentice.

To earn that title and position, you’ll need to seek out an HVAC apprenticeship program in your area. These programs can help you kickstart an HVAC career by engaging with many of the functions of a full-time technician in a hands-on environment. Apprentice programs also set you on a career track that can one day lead to mastery.

So, what are you waiting for? Check out this guide to learn about the qualifications for and benefits of seeking an HVAC apprenticeship. Soon enough, you’ll see why so many tradesmen like you are choosing this productive option to seed a fruitful career.

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Why Pursue an HVAC Career?

There are plenty of reasons to pursue an HVAC career.

In addition to the rewarding experience of working in an industrial trade, an HVAC career also imparts the following benefits to all of its participants:

  • An opportunity to help people and solve their practical problems on a personalized basis
  • An opportunity to remain active and avoid a so-called “desk job”
  • An opportunity to work on a wide variety of projects that grow your professional capabilities on the job
  • An opportunity to grow your desire from freedom and independence into a small business arrangement
hvac apprentice

2 Ways of Starting an HVAC Career

Currently, there are 2 primary ways to get an HVAC career off the ground. Be sure to consider both of these following options when determining if an HVAC career is right for you:

Being an HVAC Apprentice

Your first option for starting an HVAC career is by entering an apprenticeship program. As with almost all trade work for centuries, these programs provide you with real-world experience as coached by a current HVAC technician. This allows you to learn how to problem-solve in this field effectively while also learning the business of HVAC work. However, you are not likely to be paid for this kind of apprenticeship.

Getting Full Time Training from HVAC School

You can also choose to start your career in a technical school for HVAC work. These academic programs utilize a mix of classroom and laboratory education to build your skillset with the profession’s numerous tools. These programs also test your skills in a controlled environment while introducing you to the latest techniques for the profession. Like all higher education, these programs naturally come with a tuition cost.

Becoming an HVAC Apprentice

Before you can become an HVAC apprentice, you’ll need to follow these steps carefully:

Finding an HVAC Apprenticeship Program

Your first step on this productive path should involve researching and determining the best HVAC apprenticeship programs in your area. This can be done through several channels, all of which will require you to make personal contact with professionals presently working in the field.

To that end, your search should begin by contacting any and all HVAC-related unions in your area. Trade unions of this kind often offer apprenticeship opportunities with their members, as well as access to academic trade education scholarships. Among others, your local Union Association or SMART (Sheet Metal Workers Union) chapters are a great place to start on this front.

From there, you might consider contacting local HVAC business owners to see what opportunities they offer. While speaking with these professionals, be sure to ask about opportunities to act as an apprentice or assistant to one of their current team members. When combined with some formal education, these placements can be just as good as a standard apprenticeship.

HVAC Apprenticeship Qualifications

Once you’ve found an HVAC apprenticeship program that meets your needs, you should research any listed qualifications for that position. While precise qualifications will differ between groups, these are the most common qualifications you’ll need to meet to become an HVAC apprentice:

  • Possess a high school diploma or GED
  • Be 18 years of age or older (some groups offer apprenticeships to high schoolers who are under 18)
  • Demonstrate some basic math and algebra skills
  • Possess a valid driver’s license
  • Pass an initial drug test
  • Demonstrate the capability to work in a physically demanding environment
  • Provide proof of employment eligibility (potentially including proof of citizenship, transcripts, military discharge, or birth certificate)

Functions of an HVAC Apprentice

An HVAC apprentice may be assigned a variety of tasks when working alongside an HVAC master. Here are just a few of the most common functions performed by HVAC apprentices while on the job:

  • Installing, relocating, building, and servicing HVAC equipment
  • Installing and maintaining refrigerators
  • Installing and maintaining exhaust fan systems
  • Installing and maintaining hot water boilers and steam generators
  • Fabrication of minor sheet metal projects
  • Maintaining equipment and tools
  • Maintaining record keeping, including work and safety logs.
How-to-Tell-If-AC-Capacitor-Is-Bad

As for pay, a prospective HVAC apprentice should not expect almost any form of financial compensation unless it is explicitly outlined in their working agreement. These positions generally “pay” in their experience and access to master-level knowledge, so compensation pay is uncommon.

Career Options & Opportunities After an HVAC Internship

After completing your HVAC apprenticeship, you can begin to take the important steps needed to enter the HVAC profession. Most former HVAC interns follow this path after successfully completing their program’s graduation requirements:

Get a license

Nearly all apprentices should apply for an HVAC work license in their state at the conclusion of their program. Otherwise, you will likely not be able to legally work in this field.

Start or join an HVAC business

Many former HVAC apprentices seek out work with an existing HVAC business after completing their program. This may even include gaining full membership in the team with which the apprenticeship was completed. Alternatively, you could also start your own HVAC business if you feel that your local market is presently underserved in this department.

Continue your practical education

Former apprentices should not rest on their laurels. Instead, they should continue to grow their understanding and seek out Journeyman status in the HVAC field. Over time, this professionalized skill set can even be enhanced to Master status, often through the support of an applicable trade union.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

Is an apprenticeship required for an HVAC career?

Not necessarily. In fact, a fair number of folks today start their HVAC career by attending a trade school. That being said, even those students often engage in some form of apprenticeship before entering the professional field. As such, this path is still considered a best practice.

What essential tools do I need as an HVAC tech trainee?

There are a wide variety of tools that any HVAC apprentice should own and use when necessary. These include:

  • Assorted screwdrivers
  • Pliers & Hammer
  • Backpack/Bag
  • Headlamp
  • Assorted wrenches
  • Cutters
  • PPE (gloves, goggles, earplugs, face mask)
  • Gauges
  • Drills

Can I get hired as an HVAC apprentice without experience?

This depends on your present position. If you are still a student at a high school or trade school, you may be eligible for an apprentice program sans field experience. If you are not in school, though, some amount of practical experience will likely be required.

How long does it take to become a journeyman HVAC technician?

The precise length of time here will depend on your local and state requirements for attaining this title. However, many certifying groups allow an individual to sit for a Journeyman exam after 4-5 years of experience in the field.

How do I join an HVAC union?

To join an HVAC union, you’ll need to contact a local chapter of a trade union that covers HVAC work. This may include established groups like the Union Association or the Sheet Metal Workers Union. From there, ask about their joining requirements and be prepared to pay several fees for access to their resources.

Conclusion

As you can see, there are lots of benefits to seeking out an HVAC apprenticeship. After all, this path remains one of the most popular for folks who want to enter the HVAC installation and repair industry. Now’s a great time to pursue an apprenticeship in this field, so be sure to take this opportunity to look for programs in your area. So long as you meet the qualifications, this guide could be the start of your next engaging and prosperous career.

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HVAC Technician Certification: How To Get Your HVAC Licence

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Becoming a certified HVAC technician doesn’t have to be a years-long process. There are two primary roads to take, either through classroom education or on-the-job training. Both paths lead through EPA certification and, ultimately, your HVAC credentials.

Do you have what it takes to enter one of the fastest-growing industries in America right now? This article will take you through the paces of becoming an HVAC technician. I will show you the various steps (both mandatory and optional) and help you choose the right path to your own certification.

What is HVAC Technician Certification?

In a nutshell, HVAC technician certification is a certificate that shows you have the training, knowledge, and experience to diagnose, install, repair, and remove HVAC equipment. Depending on the area you live in, HVAC certification may or may not be required.

However, as part of your certification process, you will be required to gain your EPA certification (608). The federal government requires this certification for anyone working with refrigerants. While your job or area may not require a full HVAC certification, the EPA certification is required.

With an HVAC technician certification, you can enter the job field, get paid well for your knowledge, and have an enjoyable career in one of the fastest-growing industries for the next 10 years.

Advantages of Achieving Professional Certification

There are several advantages to gaining your HVAC tech certification. The first, and most obvious, is that you will find it easier to gain employment in the HVAC field. While having the certification doesn’t guarantee job placement, it makes you more attractive to prospective employers.

You gain the knowledge that may not otherwise be obtained. Many HVAC techs can go most of their careers without having to deal with certain aspects of the job. Through your certification process, you will get to experience just about everything that might arise during your career.

By going through the courses and exams, along with real-world training, you will get to meet people in the industry. As you may understand, knowing the right person can be the difference between being hired and still applying.

Finally, you will get a linear path through all of the certification exams and processes. Instead of having to figure out the next step, or which exam to take following the previous ones, you will have your path to HVAC tech certification laid out in front of you. You won’t have to wonder what comes next, or when it should come.

HVAC Training Options

As I mentioned at the beginning of this article, there are two primary paths to becoming HVAC certified. Let’s take a closer look at those two paths now.

Technical College/HVAC Trade Schools

The first option is to go to school. There are several options if you are searching for “the best HVAC school near me.” It goes a little deeper than that, though. The possibilities include colleges, universities, and trade schools.

If you are looking for certification only, an HVAC trade school is your best option. These will last 4 months to a year and get you prepared for HVAC careers. Most of them will have job placement programs available upon graduation. Be careful, though. Not all trade schools offer the EPA certification exam.

If you attend a college program, you will get the same experience as a trade school, but along with your certification, you can also get a degree. Most programs offer a 2-year associate’s degree, though there are a couple that do have a bachelor’s degree program. These are designed for the techs that want to advance in the career as management or start their own companies.

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Becoming a certified HVAC technician doesn’t have to be a years-long process. There are two primary roads to take, either through classroom education or on-the-job training. Both paths lead through EPA certification and, ultimately, your HVAC credentials.

Do you have what it takes to enter one of the fastest-growing industries in America right now? This article will take you through the paces of becoming an HVAC technician. I will show you the various steps (both mandatory and optional) and help you choose the right path to your own certification.

Apprenticeship/OJT

The other avenue is to get on-the-job-training (OJT) or work as an apprentice. This is the better option for those working in a related field that want to expand their resumes. While most apprenticeships do not pay, the experience will lead directly to certification. How long until you can become certified varies.

For the most part, the OJT path leads more to the required certification in your area. This may be only the EPA 608 certification, or can also include the full HVAC tech certification. You will have to check with the apprenticeship or employer to find out.

HVAC Certification Guide

So, are you ready to get HVAC technician certified? Let’s take a look at the requirements you need to meet to get that certification or degree, then.

HVAC License Requirements

To gain your HVAC certification, there are some hoops you will have to jump through. None of them are difficult, though. The time frame will depend on your availability, of course. First, you will need to obtain your high school diploma or GED. Even tech and trade schools will have this as a minimum requirement to enroll.

After enrolling, you will need to complete and pass the course. Trade schools generally last for 4 to 9 months, with tech schools lasting 6 to 12 months (some go for two years). If you decide to go the degree route, you can expect a minimum of 2 years for the associate’s degree and 4 years for the bachelor’s.

From there, you will need to pay for the certification exam, which should be state-run (or at least state-sponsored). Many of the schools will include the fees and exams with their tuition and enrollment. However, if you are going the apprentice or OJT route, you will need to find a location and pay the exam fees yourself.

Once you have passed the exam, you are technically HVAC certified. However, you still need to take and pass the EPA certification exam.

EPA Section 608 Certification

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is responsible for overseeing that all HVAC techs are certified to handle refrigerants. HVAC technicians need a minimum or the EPA 608 certification, though there are others you can obtain.

Without the 608 certification, you will not be legally allowed to purchase refrigerant, flush, vacuum, or fill refrigerant lines. You can not work on appliances, HVAC equipment, or any other item that contains refrigerant.

Note: If you plan to work in the automotive field, you will need to obtain the EPA 609 certification.

Types of Certification

There are four levels of EPA 608 certification. Each level will allow you to work with various refrigerants and equipment. Most exams will have three sections (Types I through III). You can take any or all of them, though it is recommended to take all of them (Universal) for complete certification. Here is the breakdown.

  • Type I
    The Type I certification allows you the legal right to work on small appliances with refrigerants. This will include refrigerators, coolers, portable ACs, etc.
  • Type II
    Type II certification allows you to repair and service high- and very high-pressure refrigerants, except those in small appliances and motor vehicle air conditioners (MVACs). With Type II certification, you also gain the legal right to dispose of refrigerants.
  • Type III
    Type III certification allows you to repair and service low-pressure refrigerant systems.
  • Universal EPA Certificate
    Finally, the Universal certification allows you all three (Type I, II, and III) certification allowances. Unless you are specializing in a specific type of HVAC service, the Universal certification is the one to go for.
  • North American Technician Excellence (NATE)
    The North American Technician Excellence (or NATE) is a certification coalition that provides updated HVAC/R testing and certification. Unlike the EPA 608, which never expires, the NATE certification has a 2-year validity.

NATE Entry-Level Certification

Once NATE certified, you prove you are up to date on all manner of knowledge-based HVAC systems, conditions, equipment, and tools. Since the industry changes over time, you must re-certify every 2 years. This certification is purely voluntary and isn’t a requirement in any state.

However, with the certification, you become more employable and stand out over other applicants that are not certified. It does not guarantee a job or placement, but it doesn’t hurt your chances either.

There are four steps to the NATE certification. However, steps 3 and 4 are for HVAC technicians employed for 2 or more years. This article is aimed to get you started in the career, so I will only focus on the first two steps.

Ready-to-Work Certification

The first step is for absolute beginners. Aimed at those with little to no experience or formal training, this certification is online only. In essence, it is a proving ground that you have the skills needed to become a certified technician. All study materials and the exam are done online.

HVAC Support Technician Certification

The HVAC support test is designed as a prep-course for the official NATE certification (step 3). This exam and certificate will cover the basic fundamentals of HVAC training, and ensure you know what you are doing in the field. To qualify for this exam, you must have the Ready-to-Work certificate and have worked int eh field for 6 to 12 months.

Steps 3 and 4

Briefly, let me explain the rest of the process. Once you have worked for 24 months (2 years) in the field and hold both previous certificates, you can take the Core exam. As long as you pass the Core exam and maintain your certification, you only need to take this exam once.

Step 3 then allows you to choose a service exam or installation exam (or both). Once you pass those, you are NATE certified. Step for is a master technician certification aimed at techs with a minimum of 2 years experience. However, before you can take this exam, you must pass and hold both the heating and cooling certifications from the previous step.

Other HVAC Certification Organizations

There are other certification organizations out there for you to choose from, as well. Each one has its advantages and disadvantages. However, for the self-starter, having options is a great asset.

HVAC Excellence

HVAC Excellence focuses primarily on entry-level techs. Making sure you have the required licenses and certifications needed to make a lasting career. They are now a part of the ESCOgroup (see below) and offer training, testing, and certification in entry-level, master-level, and specialized certifications for HVAC/R.

Refrigeration Service Engineers Society (RSES)

The RSES organization is responsible for certifying over 200,000 technicians across the country. They have an elaborate online database for study materials, resources, and exams. Since 2012, they have also offered NATE certifications and pride themselves on making the most knowledgeable technicians in the country.

ESCO Institute

The ESCO Institute is one of the largest and most revered certification organizations in the HVAC/R world. They specialize in their remarkable online resources and exam institutions. Not only can you become HVAC certified, EPA certified, and concentrate with other certifications, but through ESCO, you can also become an exam proctor yourself.

State Licensing

Aside from the EPA 608 requirement, each state is left to its own requirements for licenses and certifications for HVAC technicians. For the most part, you don’t have to have an HVAC technician license, though this doesn’t mean you don’t have to be certified.

Some states require a plumbing or electrical license (or both) if you are going to be independent. Working for a company, though, has fewer requirements on the individual level.

Your school or apprenticeship will have all of the required information about the laws in your state. Since each state varies (some even by region), it is beyond the scope of this article to cover them all. Check with your local HVAC trade schools for local requirements. Even if you aren’t enrolled in their programs, they will help you determine what is required in your area.

The Cost of Becoming Certified

The cost to become HVAC certified will vary by individual and needs. It also depends on which path you decide to take to become certified. If you go through an apprenticeship program, you won’t have to pay anything. However, you also won’t get paid, either, so your income will need to be subsidized somehow.

Going through a trade or technical school will cost you tuition fees that can range from a few thousand to twenty thousand. Likewise, college and university tuition fees will depend on the degree type and amount of credit hours per semester you enroll in.

The most significant cost will be your time. While it is possible to get certified in as little as four months, most technicians gain their certification in the 9 to 18-month range. This will depend on how many hours per week you can devote to the training or school and how many times you need to pass the exams.

People Also Ask (FAQs)

What is the difference between HVAC and Refrigeration certification?

The primary difference between HVAC and refrigeration training and certification is that refrigeration deals only with the cooling side of the HVAC universe. HVAC certification covers refrigeration as well as heating.

What is an HVAC engineer? Does an HVAC engineer require certification?

Instead of repairing or installing HVAC systems like a technician does, an HVAC engineer has the job of developing HVAC systems. This can be working for a company that develops HVAC equipment, or for one that designs new HVAC concepts. HVAC engineers aren’t always required to be certified (though they should be), but they are required to have formal engineering degrees, usually with a minimum of a bachelor’s degree.

Can I get certified online? When are these programs advisable?

You can get certified online. There are several certification institutes that do online testing and training. Many online organizations will train you at your own pace online but may require the certification exams to be taken on campus or in a classroom, in person. If you are a full-time worker or have other obligations that prevent you from attending a class in person during regular hours, an online training program may be the best answer for you.

What states do not require an HVAC license?

Most states do not require an HVAC license to work on HVAC equipment as an employee. However, if you are an independent contractor or own your own HVAC company, you will need to be licensed and insured. Each state carries its own rules and laws about licensure, so you will need to check with the state you plan to work in to find out their current requirements.

Do HVAC technicians make good money?

An HVAC technician with at least 1 year of employment with all required certifications can expect to make between $32,000 and $54,000 per year. The range will vary depending on employer need, location, and experience.

Does HVAC involve math?

HVAC involves a lot of math. While the actual calculations are basic math (with some algebra), you will need to be able to convert measurements, read and understand pressures, and be able to know weights, balances, and temperatures to calculate different refrigerant needs.

Is it worth going to school for HVAC?

If you plan to be an HVAC technician, you do not need to go to school. However, if you plan to be an employed HVAC technician, formal training through a school or accredited HVAC program is advised.

What colleges offer HVAC programs?

There are technical institutes and colleges in every state that offer HVAC training, certification, and degrees. Not every city or county will have an HVAC college, but chances are there is one within a 50-mile radius of your home.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

The highest degree for HVAC/R is currently a bachelor’s degree. There are only a few institutions that offer a bachelor’s program in HVAC, though, as certifications and associate’s degrees are more common.

Conclusion

Whether you want to further an HVAC career, start your own HVAC company, or start your career on the right foot, learning how to become an HVAC technician is crucial. While you have plenty of options when it comes to certification, the more certifications you hold, the better off your career will be.

At a minimum, you will need to be EPA 608 certified to get employed as an HVAC technician. Attending an HVAC trade or technical school (or college) will only enhance your career options and get you HVAC certified.

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Best HVAC Schools in Ohio: AC Training, License & Certification

The HVAC industry is booming. Right now is the perfect time to get into a career field that is both growing and lucrative. If you have thought about working on HVAC systems or learning a valuable trade, the right HVAC school can get you started on the right foot.

This article will cover all aspects of starting your HVAC career, from the required certifications to choosing the ideal school for your needs. Read on to find out what it takes for you to get going in the world of HVAC.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Ohio

Ohio doesn’t have any HVAC technician requirements. With the exception of the EPA 608 certification required nationwide, anyone can enter the HVAC field with little to no experience.

However, for those techs looking to take the next step to become a licensed contractor, Ohio has pretty strict rules you need to follow. Whether you are studying in Cincinnati, Cleveland, or Columbus, the rules are the same.

First, you must have a minimum of 5 years of technician experience. Once this is accomplished and you have obtained a minimum of $500,000 worth of contractor liability insurance coverage, you are qualified to sit for the license exam. Other qualifications, such as age, education, etc. can be found on the Ohio Construction Industry Licensing Board site page.

The exam is a tough, rigid, and lengthy test covering all aspects of HVAC/R. Passing with a score of 70% or higher will grant you a contractor’s license. There are plenty of testing sites across the state, from Dayton to Akron. Finding one won’t be hard. Passing the exam, though, might be.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

Becoming an HVAC technician in Ohio isn’t that difficult. Getting hired, though, has more challenges. Employers are looking for experienced technicians that are well qualified. To accomplish this, adding an education and possibly an apprenticeship is an ideal path plan.

First, you will need to have your high school diploma or GED. From there, you should enter a trade school or an HVAC degree course through a college or university.

During your education portion, you should strive to gain your EPA 608 certification. Some schools will offer this exam as part of their program and tuition. Others will only prep you for the exam. Make sure you know which your chosen school offers.

After graduation, you are free to enter the job market. However, if you find that your preferred employer needs experience, it may be wise to enter into an apprenticeship. You can find apprenticeships through job search boards online or make use of your school’s post-graduate programs for placement assistance.

Finally, if you have not obtained the required EPA 608 certification, you need to do that now. Once all of this is accomplished, you will find yourself highly employable and sought after.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

When choosing the best HVAC school in Ohio, you may find a lot of possibilities. To help you determine which school is ideal for your situation and circumstances, I offer this brief list of considerations.

Location

The location of the school is going to be important. However, you need to think about when the classes are scheduled and where you usually are at that time. For example, if you have a current job in a neighboring city and decide to take night classes, it may be more fitting to find a school closer to work.

Likewise, just because a school is close to you, doesn’t mean it is a great school. Sometimes a little deeper research and finding a school a few extra miles away will greatly increase your education and ability to get hired.

Accredited School

School accreditation is important, as well. A non-accredited school diploma or degree is basically meaningless. Most employers will turn away applicants because they didn’t attend an accredited school.

This isn’t a chance you want to take, so take the time to look up your chosen school to ensure it has accreditation status.

Offers Quality Education

Quality education comes in many forms. You can look at the HVAC books and even the HVAC software the school uses. However, the best way to determine if the school has a high-quality education system is to visit the campus.

Take the time to learn the campus, talk to current students and faculty to find out how the entire atmosphere feels to you.

Offers Hands-on Training

Hands-on training in the HVAC education system is one of the most important. You can get by on some book learning and listening to lectures. However, when it comes to performing your duties as an HVAC technician, you need to know what you are doing.

The only way to become proficient with the systems, equipment, and tools is to use them. Lab hours are crucial to your future, and you need to find a school that focuses more efforts in the lab versus in the classroom.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Next, you will want to check on the post-graduate programs. Many schools will offer job placement as an option, but you should also check if they offer apprenticeship and internship programs.

Most of these placement opportunities are for the life of the graduate and are invaluable over time for your career and advancement opportunities.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Finally, you should check the class curriculum. You should check to find out if there is a customer service section. Customer service is a large portion of your duties as a technician, and if you don’t have prior training in customer service skills, you need to get them now.

11 Best HVAC Schools in Ohio

Below, you will find the best HVAC schools in Ohio. Scroll through the reviews and overviews to find the best school for your HVAC career goals.

1. Columbus State Community College
Address: 550 East Spring St. Columbus, OH 43215

Best Choice For: All-inclusive AAS degree program

Columbus State Community CollegeColumbus State Community College has one of the most advanced and thorough HVAC degree programs available.

This associate’s degree program takes you through every aspect of HVAC, from pipe fitting to 3-D computer drawing and systems design. You will get a lot of classroom work here, but there is plenty of hands-on as well.

Through this program, you will not only get to work on some of the most modern systems available, but you will also learn all of the crucial factors generally only found in the field (such as airflow, design concepts, heat transfer diagnosis, and much more).

With the degree, you can begin your new career or continue on to a bachelor’s degree program.

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2. University of Northwestern Ohio
Address: 1441 N. Cable Rd. Lima, Ohio 45805

Best Choice For: Complete technician training

University of Northwestern OhioIf you are looking for more options, UNOH offers an associate’s degree HVAC program as well as an HVAC technician diploma program.

Both take you through both residential and commercial HVAC system repair, installation, and diagnosis.

The degree program is geared towards continuing education for those looking to become contractors or reach a bachelor’s degree. The technician diploma program aims to get you through the education portion and move you through certification so you can begin work soon.

3. Fortis College
Address: 11499 Chester Rd #200, Cincinnati, OH 45246

Best Choice For: Fast track to entry-level employment

Fortis CollegeFortis College has an HVAC program that teaches you the HVAC fundamentals and gets you ready for an entry-level position virtually anywhere in the state.

There are 4 campuses around Ohio for your convenience. You can study HVAC in Cincinnati, Cuyahoga Falls, Columbus, or Centerville.

The course is designed to teach you the tools needed to diagnose and repair residential HVAC systems, customer service, HVAC theory, and certification preparations. For a quick learning experience and great post-grad programs to get you working faster, there isn’t much better than Fortis College.

4. Miami Valley Career Technology Center
Address: 6801 Hoke Rd, Clayton, OH 45315

Best Choice For: Complete HVAC training programs

Miami Valley Career Technology CenterMiami Valley Career Tech has an intensive, 720 hour HVAC program that will take you through three levels of HVAC tech training. You also learn OSHA standards, as well as pipe fitting, airflow, and HVAC theory.

This 54-week course is taught 3 days a week in the evening from 5:30 to 10 pm. The course is long, but thorough and will have you ready for any HVAC career choice you want to pursue.

The school has a degree program connection with Sinclair Community College, where most of the credit-hours will transfer for those wishing to continue towards an associate’s degree.

5. New Castle School of Trades – East Liverpool Campus
Address: 129 E 5th St, East Liverpool, OH 43920

Best Choice For: New technicians with no knowledge or experience with HVAC

New Castle School of Trades – East Liverpool CampusNew Castle has an HVAC program similar to Miami Valley listed above. This course is a month shorter (50 weeks instead of 54) but covers much of the same concepts.

Besides HVAC theory, you get plenty of hands-on training in the lab portion as well as taking you through the three levels of HVAC tech training.

With this course, you don’t get the college connection, but you will be more than prepared for entry-level positions, commercial or residential HVAC employment or pursuing your own contracting business.

6. Remington College
Address: 14445 Broadway Ave, Cleveland, OH 44125

Best Choice For: Hybrid learning online and in the lab

Remington College offers a diploma program that takes only 12 months to complete. The course has a great lab, though admittedly, it isn’t the largest or most up to date, and you will get plenty of hands-on experience.

The draw here, though, is that the course is a hybrid course, with much of the classroom and book learning done online. The lab work is hands-on and takes place on campus, but you can make a more flexible schedule to work around your current needs.

7. Pike County Career Tech Center
Address: 175 Beaver Creek Rd Piketon, OH 45661

Best Choice For: Hands-on training with in-depth instruction

Pike County Career Tech CenterPike County Career Tech offers a 2-year program that is both intense and thorough. With this course, you will get more hands-on training that you can handle.

By the end of the course, you will have a vast knowledge and understanding of current, modern, and future HVAC systems.

While there isn’t much detail spent on solar and green technology, you will perform installs, maintenance, repairs, and diagnostics on some of the industry’s top brands and systems.

The course also preps you for the EPA exam as well as the HVAC HEAT exam.

8. Southern Ohio Technical Institute
Address: 671 Ohio Pike suite i, Cincinnati, OH 45245

Best Choice For: Fast track to employment

Southern Ohio Technical InstituteIf you want to start your career right now, then Southern Ohio Technical Institute is where you want to go. You will get a fast-paced instruction from some of the state’s leading instructors in a course that takes you from zero to employable in just 200 hours.

The course is intense, and there isn’t much room for mistakes. However, by the end of this extreme course, you will have the confidence to handle any situation, diagnose any HVAC system, and understand how all of the tools work. SOTI also has a great relationship with local businesses and a better job placement program than most.

9. Apollo Career Center
Address: 3325 Shawnee Rd, Lima, OH 45806

Best Choice For: EPA certification courses

Apollo Career CenterThe Apollo Career Center isn’t your average trade school. Built inside their extensive Industrial Maintenance Technician course, you will find over a dozen modules. One of those modules is HVAC training.

You can take this course as a part of the IMT course, or as a stand-alone part-time class. It is a brief class, consisting of 18 weeks, but it does include the EPA 608 exam, and the cost of the test is included in the tuition.

10. Great Oaks Institute of Technology
Address: Cincinnati and Milford, Ohio

Best Choice For: Adult education or continuing credit transfer courses

Great Oaks Institute of TechnologyGreat Oaks Institute of Technology offers an adult training course designed to get you going in a new career. Even if you have been out of school for years, it is a great time to come back and learn a new skill. GOIT has your answer.

This HVAC readiness course takes you through all the phases of HVAC certification and includes prep for EPA 608, NATE, and HVAC Excellence exams.

If you are looking to start a new career, HVAC is a wise choice. No other school has you graduate with more certifications or the ability to transfer up to 23 credits to most Ohio colleges.

11. Collins Career Technical Center
Address: 11627 OH-243, Chesapeake, OH 45619

Best Choice For: Complete course through certification

Collins Career Technical CenterIn Chesapeake, you will find the Collins Career Technical Center offering adult education courses in HVAC. This course is designed to teach you the theory, mathematics, sciences, and applied physics behind HVAC as well as get you certified the ESCO’s HVAC Excellence certifications.

The course covers 900 hours in a 12-month program with an optional second year of training with another 900 hours. The intense lab time is spent one on one with some of the most experienced instructors around.

HVAC Training School Costs in Ohio

The cost of tuition, either with or without financial aid, will come down to a few factors. The major determining factor is the type of school you will attend.

Trade schools tend to last from a couple of months to a year. These courses are more specialized and give you what you need to start your career. As a result, they are generally cheaper than attending a college or university.

Trade school costs in Ohio will range in price from a few hundred per course to as much as $6,000.

For a degree in HVAC, you will need to attend a college or university. These costs will depend on the type of degree. Associate’s degrees will need between 3 and 4 semesters, while a bachelor’s degree can take up to 8 semesters.

The cost per semester will depend on the number of credit hours, if you are a state resident or not and other factors. In general, for these two degrees, you can expect a total tuition cost between $20,000 and $40,000.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Ohio?

As a career, HVAC is one of the top rated and fastest growing industries in the country. The growth rate and annual profit margins of the market are expected to continue to rise over the next decade.

Because of that, starting and experienced salaries are excellent across the board. Ohio is no exception.

Ohio Entry Level HVAC Salary

For those just starting out in the industry, the lack of experience will be the hardest factor on your potential income. However, everyone goes through this, and even starting salaries in Ohio are worth it.

According to Indeed.com, HVAC techs with less than 2-years experience can expect to earn an average of $23.48 per hour. This doesn’t include overtime pay, or benefits, either, which most HVAC techs will see a lot of.

Ohio HVAC Tech Salary

For experienced technicians with 5 or more years in the industry, the wages increase a great deal. This only proves that sticking with the job will have monumental benefits down the road.

Salary.com puts the Ohio technician in the 25th to 35th percentile. The average annual salary falls between $41,000 and $58,000. Again, this doesn’t include overtime pay, holidays, and other benefits.

Well educated technicians and those that continue to learn about the changing industry (studying solar power or green HVAC solutions, for example) only go to raise your value and income potential.

The top 10% of technicians in Ohio report earnings as much as $72,000 per year.

Return on Investment

The return on investment (ROI) for HVAC technicians is also high. On average, it only takes about 10 years to repay all debts, student loans, and tools or equipment costs.

This is lower than most other industries, some of which require 25 or more years to become debt-free. With such a high ROI, a career in HVAC is not only valuable but lucrative as well.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Ohio

The HVAC industry is ever-growing. Even when things aren’t progressing in the residential or commercial sector, there are things behind the scenes evolving. For example, solar power and green technologies are pushing in the new era of HVAC.

Because of these aspects and the growing need for HVAC systems, the demand for high-quality technicians is at an all-time high, and only getting larger.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How long does a HVAC certification last?

A lot will depend on your location and type of certification. The EPA 608 certification, for example, never expires. HVAC degrees also never expire, but you are expected to stay up-to-date on your own. For HVAC certifications, there isn’t a required expiration in Ohio. However, other states may require you to renew your certification every few years.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online? How much does a HVAC license cost?

No. Certification has prerequisites and requirements that cannot be met online alone. You can study for the exams online, but for certification, you must be in person to take the tests. Lab work and hands-on training are also impossible to achieve working online. While many schools are switching to 3-D models that you can interact with online, the lab requirements are still not yet met by taking these types of lab courses.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Ohio?

There are quite a few apprenticeship opportunities across the state. You can check in with the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services website to find an apprenticeship program near you.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

In Ohio, it is possible to enter into an HVAC career with little to no experience. It does make it much tougher to get hired, of course, and without a formal education in the field, your chances of standing out and becoming employed are less. However, as long as you can hold the EPA 608 certification, you are eligible to work as an HVAC technician.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

There are two degrees in the HVAC industry. The 2-year associate’s degree is ideal for those that want a degree without the hassle of having to obtain every possible certification out there. If you are looking to start a career as a contractor, going for the 4-year bachelor’s degree is a great option. The bachelor’s is the highest HVAC degree available, and many universities have a fast-track course to get your degree in under 4 years.

Conclusion

Finding the right HVAC school in Ohio is the best bet you will have at starting your new career off on the right foot. This article gave you factors to consider when choosing the right school for you. I also provided a list of worthy candidates that meet all of the requirements for a budding HVAC technician.

Hopefully, you have a better idea of what you need to do and how you should approach finding the perfect HVAC school to meet all of your needs.

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Best HVAC Schools in Chicago, Illinois: Air Conditioning Training & Trade

In Illinois, the need for adequately trained HVAC technicians is on the rise. If you want to get into this rewarding career, there isn’t a better time. The right school can send you on your way to full certification and a great job with a top-tier employer.

This article will examine what it takes to get certified in HVAC, help you decide if you want a certification or degree, and give you the best schools in and around Chicago, Illinois, to get you started.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Chicago, IL

The state of Illinois does not have any regulations for HVAC technicians. All of the certifications and degrees are on a personal basis only. However, most employers are looking for fully certified technicians. So, while the state may not have requirements, individual employers might.

If you are studying in Chicago, East Peoria, Addison, or Dixon, there are requirements for becoming a contractor. This is state-wide, not just these specific cities. Though, those cities, along with Springfield and Decatur, are among the best places to study in for these certifications.

Keep in mind that the state of Illinois does not have specific contractor license requirements, either. However, these regulations are left up to the local area government, which means that Springfield might have different contractor license requirements than Chicago. You will need to check within the municipalities where you plan to work to find out what they require of you.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

To become an HVAC technician in Illinois, you need only pass the federal requirement of obtaining the EPA 608 certification. This certification allows you to work with refrigeration systems, as well as use, regulate, and dispose of refrigerant.

The EPA 608 certification has four types, Types I, II, and III allow various types of refrigeration systems (low pressure, high pressure, etc.). If you pass the entire exam, you will become EPA 608 Universal certified. This certification never expires and transfers to every state in the US.

While these requirements are at a state level, contractors, businesses, and other HVAC employers may require more. You should attend an accredited HVAC trade school college or university to obtain a certification. The NATE certification is one of many that you should strive for.

It is also wise to attend an internship or apprenticeship program to become experienced working on HVAC systems. Once this is complete, you will find yourself in demand and highly sought-after in the HVAC industry within Illinois.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Below you will find a brief overview of the various factor you should consider when choosing the best HVAC school in Illinois that meets your specific needs.

Location

The location of the campus in relation to your home or place of current employment is crucial. Distance, as well as traffic, unexpected problems, and the like, will all determine how often you actually attend classes and on time.

The problem, though, is that this isn’t the only factor. You may find that a better school is further away. Location is a critical factor, but don’t make it the only factor.

Accredited School

School accreditation is something that is done through governing bodies. Each school must meet minimum educational quality metrics to become accredited. Non-accredited schools are met with some hostility, generally don’t hang around very long, and are more expensive.

If you do attend a non-accredited school, your certificate or degree may be worthless in the eyes of employers and a general waste of time and money. Run a check and make sure your school is accredited.

Offers Quality Education

The accreditation is important, but these only meet minimum requirements. The true quality of the education offered is best experienced first-hand. You should make an effort to attend the campus of your potential choice and talk to the faculty and students.

Get a feel of how the classes are structured, what is taught, how tough the classes are, and what happens in the hands-on labs. The more you know about the workings of the school that websites won’t tell you is more important than reading through a list of what they offer.

Offers Hands-on Training

Hands-on training is crucial for HVAC technicians. Tools, systems, and equipment will vary from vendor to vendor, and you should know how to use the proper tools on the right systems. Hands-on training gives you a familiarity with all of these topics and allows you to test your knowledge on a real system without worry of causing further damage to a customer’s HVAC unit.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Most schools do offer a post-graduate program. Many will offer job placement, but you should also look for those that offer apprenticeship or internship placement programs. While getting placed in a job is great, you have a better chance at higher-paying opportunities if you have real-world experience.

Apprenticeships and internships give you this real-world training, and if your school works with companies in this capacity, it is a lot easier on you.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Customer service is an often-overlooked skill that is highly important to the HVAC technician. It is wise to search for a school that has a customer service portion included in their curriculum.

Since you will be dealing with customers at their home or business daily, this is one skill set you don’t want to pass on.

12 Best HVAC Schools in Illinois

Below you will find a list of the best HVAC schools in Illinois. Each one is reviewed and evaluated. I have also separated them by region, so you can scroll through and find the ones close to you.

Chicago, Illinois

1. HVAC Technical Institute
Address: 4532 S Kolin Ave, Chicago, IL 60632

Best Choice For: Top rated HVAC school in Illinois

HVAC Technical InstituteHVAC Tech is one of the top rated schools in the state and for a good reason. They focus their courses on hands-on training with some of the most modern equipment in the industry today.

You will work one on one with instructors diagnosing and repairing systems you find in the field every day.

The best part is that this school also gives you a certificate of completion, and you will leave with the EPA 608 Universal as well as R-410a certifications in hand.

A complete education, training, and lab work with certification to get your foot in the door on your new career. What more could you ask for?

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2. Coyne College
Address: 1 N State St #400, Chicago, IL 60602

Best Choice For: Complete HVAC system experience and learning

Coyne CollegeCoyne College offers a 42-week diploma program for HVAC training, which you will find among the most intensive and hands-on.

Most graduates report that they are still finding things in the field that were already covered in the class even years later.

If you want an education that will prolong your skillset or give you the tools you need to succeed, this is it.

You will still be responsible for the EPA certification on your own after graduation, but their post-grad programs can help with that. They also offer financial aid and flexible class schedules to fit your needs.

Springfield, IL

3. Midwest Technical Institute
Address: 2731 Farmers Market Rd, Springfield, IL 62707

Best Choice For: Hands-on learning with certification

Midwest Technical InstituteMidwest Technical Institute (MTI) has a 9-month HVAC course made to get you into the field, earning a paycheck. Your experience in the lab will carry over to the real world, and you aren’t left stranded, either.

During the course, you will be required to take and pass the EPA 608 Core exams (Type I and Type II). For Universal certification, you will need to take the Type III exam as well, though this will be done outside of the school.

For those in East Peoria or Moline, there are also MTI campuses there for you. The same courses and attention to detail are offered at all campuses; choose the one easiest for you to get to.

Prospect Heights, IL

4. Chicago Professional Center
Address: 16 E. Piper Ln. Ste 127 Prospect Heights, IL 60070

Best Choice For: Post-graduate programs and career counseling

Chicago Professional CenterChicago Professional Center focuses on getting you working. Their main goal is to give you all the tools you need and all the certifications you could dream of.

During the course, you will learn about all aspects of HVAC, including current and future technologies and PLC training (optional).

The course is designed to get you certified in EPA 608 and R-410a, along with green technology certification, electricians license, and Power Engineer License (which is optional).

Their career counseling services and post-grad programs are among the best and are centered around your specific goals.

Willowbrook, IL

5. ETI School of Skilled Trades
Address: 500 Joliet Rd #100, Willowbrook, IL 60527

Best Choice For: Flex scheduling with full certification

ETI School of Skilled TradesAt the ETI School of Skilled Trades, you can gear up and enter the workforce in as little as 7 months.

With their accelerated program, you get intensive lab hours that take you hands-on through some of the most modern and expansive systems on the market.

Upon graduation, you also have the opportunity to test for the EPA exams as well as several other, though optional, certifications.

There are day and evening classes available, and they offer financial aid to those that qualify.

Batavia, IL

6. West Chicago Professional Center
Address: 1801 E Fabyan Pkwy, West Chicago, IL 60185

Best Choice For: Those with no prior knowledge or experience

West Chicago Professional CenterIf you are in more of a hurry, give West Chicago Professional Center a try. They offer a 3-class course lasting a total of 12 weeks.

Each course is designed to take over where the previous one left off. Ideal for those with no prior HVCAC knowledge, this class takes you from complete beginner to EPA certified technician.

Once you graduate, you will be able to step into the job market and apply your skills in a rewarding and near future-proof industry.

The lab and classroom hours are about evenly split, and the training includes progressive system technologies as well as current industry trends.

Elk Grove Village, IL

7. Learn your Trade
Address: 2458 Elmhurst Rd, Elk Grove Village, IL 60007

Best Choice For: Full-time HVAC apprenticeship

Learn your TradeThe Illinois chapter of the ABC apprenticeship training programs has partnered with Learn Your Trade for an all-inclusive apprentice session in HVAC.

The best part is that their apprenticeship program is not only state-of-the-art but geared for all age groups.

If you are still in high school, you can sign up and begin taking basic classes to get you prepared for your career after graduation.

If you already have your diploma (or GED), you can jump right in full-time and get the most out of the apprenticeship program.

Melrose Park, IL

8. Lincoln College of Technology
Address: 8317 W North Ave, Melrose Park, IL 60160

Best Choice For: Top rated HVAC school in the country

Lincoln College of TechnologyLincoln Tech is a school that spans the entire country, and its courses, campuses, and instructors are always among the best.

In Melrose Park, you will find the Lincoln Tech school to be everything you could want, and a bit more.

With future technologies being the primary focus and enough lab work to have you ready for anything in the real world, this school delivers.

They also partner with most local companies for internships or direct job placement, boasting over 90% employment in the trade for all graduates.

Rockford, IL

9. Rockford Career College
Address: 1130 S Alpine Rd #100, Rockford, IL 61108

Best Choice For: Accelerated degree program

Rockford Career CollegeRockford Career College is an accredited school that offers a 10-month diploma program in HVAC.

This program gives you customer service, hands-on and theory learning in all matters related to the industry. You get to know the equipment and tools for installation, repair, and diagnostics.

If you are interested in a degree, Rockford is where you want to start. Their accelerated associate’s degree program (Construction Management AAS) is only an additional 7 months after completing the HVAC course.

You can have your AAS in construction with advanced HVAC knowledge in less than a year and a half.

Dixon, IL

10. Sauk Valley Community College
Address: 173 IL-2, Dixon, IL 61021

Best Choice For: Low cost complete course

Sauk Valley Community CollegeSauk Valley offers an entry-level training program designed for those out of high school that know what they want.

This lab-intensive training course will have you on your way to being an expert in HVAC repair, diagnostics, and installation.

Upon graduation, you will know the ins and outs of the HVAC industry as well as being ready for any certification exam you can find.

This biggest draw is the course cost, with in-district students paying less than $3,000 for the entire course.

Cicero, IL

11. Morton College
Address: 3801 S Central Ave, Cicero, IL 60804

Best Choice For: Choice of certification or degree in HVAC

Morton CollegeMorton College offers two HVAC training programs. The first is the certification course that takes you hands-on in the lab for an immersive and challenging training curriculum.

With full EPA certification upon graduation, you are ready to enter the workforce and start your rewarding career in HVAC.

The second option is an AAS degree program that spends time in the classroom and the lab. You will learn electrical and refrigeration theory, customer service skills, and installation procedures.

Upon graduation, you can then begin your career or continue to a 4-year university in search of a bachelor’s degree.

Decatur, IL

12. Richland Community College
Address: 1 College Park, Decatur, IL 62521

Best Choice For: Continuing education in HVAC

Richland Community CollegeWith four courses to choose from, Richland Community College offers you the chance to specialize in the exact area of HVAC you are most interested in.

If you plan to start your own business as a contractor, the AAS degree program is the most inclusive of the group.

You can also become fully certified in residential or commercial HVAC or niche down to residential HVAC installer certification.

For those looking to continue their education levels, these certification courses are ideal for staying up on current trends.

HVAC Training School Costs in Illinois

The cost of your tuition will depend significantly on the type of school you attend and the level of certification or degree you are after. Trade schools that offer certification preparation are the least expensive, and in Illinois, average between $1,500 and $5,000.

Other trade schools that offer the certification exams during the course tend to be longer and cost a little more, with a high-end range of about $7,500. Colleges and universities will be the most expensive when you attend for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree program.

For these schools, the cost will depend on state residency, type of degree, and if the school accepts currently held credit-hours. You can expect to spend between $20,000 and $40,000 for these institutions. Most schools will offer tuition assistance or financial aid, so you should see if you qualify.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Chicago, Illinois?

Illinois has one of the lowest state-level requirements for HVAC technicians and one of the highest entry-level pay rates. Combined, these factors make the HVAC industry very lucrative and rewarding in Illinois.

Chicago, Illinois Entry Level HVAC Salary

When you are just starting out, it is expected that you will earn less per hour until you prove yourself. However, according to Indeed.com, in Illinois, you can expect a livable wage that will range between $22 and $26 per hour, depending on who you work for and the region you work in.

There are plenty of entry-level jobs posted on job board sites, making the entry-level hiring process a bit easier than other states like California or cities such as Las Vegas.

Chicago Illinois HVAC Tech Salary

Experienced techs with 5 or more years working in the industry can expect better wages overall. The average state-wide salary range is between $41,000 to $53,000 per year, according to Salary.com. However, the top 10% of HVAC technicians claim yearly earnings that top $62,000.

This will depend on your company and region, of course. More substantial demand and the more certification or experience you bring, the higher you can expect your wage to be.

Return of Investment

The return on investment (ROI) is determined by how quickly you can become employed, earn a wage, and pay off your debts. These debts are things like tool and equipment purchases, school tuition fees, and other work-related materials.

With the higher starting wages and lower entry requirements, Illinois has one of the highest ROI’s of any state. On average across America, the time for someone living alone and paying off their debts is about 12 years. For Illinois, the average is about 8 to 9 years.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Illinois

According to the BLS, the HVAC industry is expected to maintain a 13% increase in jobs over the next decade. This is one of the highest growth rates of any industry in the country. For Illinois specifically, the demand is about the same, between 12 and 14%.

With emerging technologies in the green and solar fields, HVAC is due to expand rapidly and with no looking back. The demand for highly-trained and educated technicians is only going to rise.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How do I get an HVAC job in Illinois?

The only requirement for HVAC industry employment is the EPA 608 certification. Once you have that, you can begin applying for jobs. However, the best practice is to attend a training school, become certified, and enter an apprenticeship for more experience. Going this route takes longer, but produces better job opportunities with higher wages.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

Because Illinois doesn’t require any state-level certifications or licenses for HVAC technicians, you can accomplish most of the classroom and book style learning online. This is ideal when you cannot make it to a school or campus for any reason. However, you are required to hold an EPA 608 certification. This exam must be taken in person with a certified proctor, which means you cannot become an HVAC technician solely working online.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Illinois?

There are plenty of apprenticeships in Illinois. The state participates in the ApprenticeshipUSA Initiative. You can check online for openings, details, and applications. Other options include checking with your school’s post-graduate programs office for assistance or browsing job board sites for possible opportunities.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

In the state of Illinois, aside from the EPA certification, you have no other obligations. You can begin working as soon as you are EPA certified. Having experience, either real-world, apprenticeship or schooling, is recommended, though it isn’t required.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

There are two possible degrees in the HVAC industry. The associate’s degree will take you between 18 and 24 months to complete, depending on the school’s schedule and your existing credits. The bachelor’s degree is a 4-year degree program but may be fast-tracked in as few as 36 months. You can reach a Master’s degree; however, this is in engineering, and not HVAC specifically. There isn’t a doctorate program in HVAC available anywhere.

Conclusion

Finding the best HVAC school in Illinois can be challenging. With so many schools and opportunities to choose from, making the right call can be tricky.

Hopefully, this article helped you learn what to look for in a school, what type of program you want to pursue and showed you local schools worthy of deeper consideration.

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Best HVAC Schools in Colorado: Air Conditioning Training, License & Certification

Becoming an HVAC technician is one of the most rewarding and in-demand jobs across the country right now. It is expected to stay this way for the next decade, too. If you have thought about working in the HVAC industry, now is the time.

This article will examine the best HVAC schools in Colorado to help get you started off on the right foot towards your full HVAC certification. I will also cover things to look for when deciding on a school and how to become a fully certified HVAC tech in the great state of Colorado.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Colorado

On a state level, Colorado does not have any special technician requirements. However, you must be aware that the EPA regulates who can work on refrigerated systems. All HVAC technicians are required, by law, to obtain the EPA 608 certification (Type I, II, III, or Universal).

If you are looking to gain experience and start your own HVAC company, you will need to hold a Colorado contractor’s license. This is also a different beast as the state itself does not have or hold specific requirements. Instead, these are handled on a municipality level. What grants you a contractor’s license in Denver or Colorado Springs may differ in Centennial, Lakewood, or Westminster.

In general, though, you will need to pass an ICC exam (generally the F13 – Class C). These exams are the first step for a contractor’s license. From there, each city will have it’s own rules, regulations, and exams.

Also, important to note, Colorado is one of the few states that doesn’t designate HVAC as it’s own profession. Instead, you will need to contract as a Master Plumber or Master (or Journeyman) Electrician with HVAC capabilities.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

The process of becoming an HVAC technician in Colorado is relatively simple. While the hours may be long and exams difficult, the timeline is straightforward.

First, you need to obtain your high school diploma or GED. This will be the first step in every state, but it needs to be mentioned. From there, you have a few options. The best method, though, is outlined below.

  • Attend an accredited HVAC school or course through a trade school, college, or university.
  • Gain acceptance into an apprenticeship program or internship in HVAC.
  • Obtain your EPA 608 certification and take any certification exams deemed needed (NATE, for example).
  • As a fully certified HVAC tech with experience, begin looking for that ideal, full-time job.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Below you will find a brief overview of several factors worthy of consideration. Each school you are thinking about should fit your specific needs based on the following parameters.

Location

Where the school is, physically, in proximity to your home or work is essential. You want to be able to make it to the classes on time and on a regular basis. Keeping in mind things like schedules, traffic and unexpected accidents, the closer the school is to you, the better it can be.

However, don’t let this be the only factor for determining the school you attend. You may find a better match for your specific needs a little further away.

Accredited School

School accreditation is important, as well. This is the process the school goes through to prove to the governing bodies they offer a full, robust, and regulated education system. While accreditation only means they meet the minimum standards set by these governing bodies, it is a clear indicator they are a quality school.

Offers Quality Education

The overall quality of the education is the most important aspect. The only way to know for sure is to either attend the school and hope for the best, or, better yet, visit the school.

When you visit the campus, you can talk to current students and instructors to find out their thoughts and feelings. You will also get a better feel for the campus and atmosphere. Figuring out what books the school uses, or what HVAC software they have for use is also an important factor in deciding the quality of their system.

Offers Hands-on Training

Hands-on training is crucial to becoming an HVAC technician. Without the lab work, you can only see how a tool works or check diagrams of operational systems. Getting your hands on the tools and understanding the equipment is the only way to learn how everything works together.

Many certifications require a minimum amount of lab hours. Ensure your school offers a healthy dose of lab work, which should equal or exceed the number of classroom hours.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Many schools also offer post-graduate programs, and it is highly recommended that you find such a school. Not only will these programs help you apply for posted jobs, but they can also help you get into a quality apprenticeship program.

Many of the steps required to gain acceptance in these programs are challenging to obtain or meet on your own. The assistance of the school and personnel that know how these systems work is only advantageous for you.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Customer service skills training is also something you want to look for. A lot of your time as a technician in the field will be spent with customers. Knowing how to communicate with them effectively is a big part of your job, and the training should also be a good portion of the school’s curriculum.

9 Best HVAC Schools in Colorado

Below you will find the best HVAC schools in Colorado. Each is separated by region or city and gives you an overview of what to expect from each institution. Scroll through and find your next Colorado HVAC school.

Denver, CO

1. Leonardi HVAC Training Center
Address: 7230 Gilpin Way Suite 100, Denver, CO 80229

Best Choice For: Fast tracking to a new career

Leonardi HVAC Training CenterSmall class sizes, one on one interaction, and plenty of lab work with today’s modern tools and systems. This is the dedication that Leonardi HVAC training center offers you.

Unlike many other schools on the list, the Leonardi training center is focused around the ideals of the owner, Don Leonardi, the certified instructor and spearhead creator of the Denver Institute of Technology’s associate degree program.

This course brings you face to face with the equipment, technology, and tools that you use today and will see in the future. When the session is complete, you are ready for the EPA 608 exam, NATE certification, and apprenticeship applications.

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2. Lincoln College of Technology
Address: 11194 E. 45th Avenue, Denver, CO 80239

Best Choice For: A complete and thorough HVAC education

Lincoln College of TechnologyYou will see Lincoln College of Technology on a lot of lists spanning many cities around the country. That is because their system just works.

With a vast, 200,000 square foot lab, the Denver branch offers one of the most robust and thorough lab environments in the state.

Here, you learn in the classroom to prepare you for emerging technology, theory, and electrical system understanding. In the lab, you get to put hands-on tools, diagnose, repair, and install equipment to learn first-hand how things are handled in the field.

3. Emily Griffith Technical College Trades Campus
Address: 1205 Osage St, Denver, CO 80203

Best Choice For: Flexible schedule learning

Emily Griffith Technical College Trades CampusThe Emily Griffith College of Trades is an excellent source of modern teachings with future implications.

Using state of the art equipment in their new campus location labs, you not only get to work on live systems that techs encounter every day, but you also get to see the emerging technologies of tomorrow.

In the classroom, your instructors will cover theory, technologies, and diagnostics. You get a full education that has you ready for all the required (and optional) certification exams.

The course is full-time or part-time, with a total of 59 credit hours. They also offer a lab/online hybrid learning course.

Colorado Springs, CO

4. Pikes Peak Community College
Address: 5675 S Academy Blvd, Colorado Springs, CO 80906

Best Choice For: Multiple certifications or degree programs

Pikes Peak Community CollegeIf you are looking for entry-level skills or continuing education to advance your skillset and gain a promotion, Pikes Peak is for you.

These two certification courses are aimed at new students that wish to learn about HVAC or experienced technicians wishing to stay current in their field.

PPCC also offers a 2-year associate’s degree program that will prepare you to start your career as an HVAC contractor.

They also have the bridge program that allows you to take your AAS and credit-hours and apply them to a fellow 4-year university for those that wish to pursue a bachelor’s degree in HVAC.

Grand Junction, CO

5. IntelliTec College in Grand Junction
Address: 772 Horizon Dr, Grand Junction, CO 81506

Best Choice For: Multi-campus degree programs

IntelliTec College in Grand JunctionIntelliTec College has two campuses to serve you better. The main campus in Colorado Springs and the secondary campus in Grand Junction offers the same lab and classroom learning experience.

You only need to pick the one that is easiest for you to attend.

Both campuses offer the Associate’s of Occupational Studies (AOS) degree in the HVAC field, with theory, customer service, diagnostics, installation, and repair all covered.

You will receive plenty of hands-on training in large lab environments that help you understand the technologies and tools used in the field today.

Centennial, CO

6. NTT Training
Address: 6675 S Kenton St #100, Centennial, CO 80111

Best Choice For: Full certification on campus

NTT TrainingIf you want a robust education that not only prepares you for certification but also offers the exams on-site, NTT is the choice for you.

Their extensive program teaches you everything you need to know to become a fully certified HVAC technician.

You will learn about refrigeration, theory, and repairs in a state of the art lab where instructors give you a lot of hands-on training.

The course also preps you for EPA 608, EPA R-410a, NATE, and HVAC Excellence certifications. All of the exams, with the exception of the NATE exam, are offered on campus when you are ready to take them.

Westminster, Colorado

7. Front Range Community College
Address: 3645 W 112th Ave, Westminster, CO 80031

Best Choice For: Various choices for HVAC industry employment

Front Range Community CollegeFront Range is another community college with several campuses state-wide. The Westminster and Fort Collins campuses give you the best of the HVAC industry learning.

At the Fort Collins (Larimer campus), you can attend the HVAC AAS degree program. This 2-year program gives you a head start in your contractor or self-employed career.

The Westminster campus is designed for those that want a career as an HVAC technician without all the hassle.

Offering three certification programs, you can choose between repair and installation, residential or all-inclusive HVAC certifications. Each campus has a great lab and classroom settings to get the most out of your education.

Lakewood, Colorado

8. Red Rocks Community College
Address: 13300 W 6th Ave Frontage Rd, Lakewood, CO 80228

Best Choice For: Future technology learning

Red Rocks Community CollegeFor those that want to future-proof their education, Red Rocks Community College offers a certification and degree program that not only teaches you about the technologies of today but further explores the technologies of tomorrow.

With full working labs that cover standard HVAC, you will also find plenty of hands-on with hydronic heating, solar, and green technology systems that are becoming prominent in the HVAC field.

Being fully trained in these systems will ensure you are in demand once you graduate.

Aurora, CO

9. Pickens Technical College
Address: 500 Airport Blvd Aurora, CO 80011

Best Choice For: Hands-on training with internship opportunities

Pickens Technical CollegeFlexible schedule for classes and intense lab-work learning are the focus of the Pickens Technical College. If you want hands-on training, there are few better options.

At Pickens, you get lab work that focuses on the tools and equipment, like the rest, but there is a lot more. You also focus on repairs, troubleshooting, and performance after repairs.

Not only that, but the school works directly with both Aurora Public Schools Maintenance Department and with Cherry Creek School District to offer you internship programs.

These real-world positions give you the insight knowledge and training used in the field on a daily basis.

HVAC Training School Costs in Colorado

The tuition costs are directly determined by the type of school you attend. In general situations, trade schools and HVAC specialty schools charge less than colleges and universities. This is mainly due to the shorter course length and fewer classes required for completion.

Most trade schools in Colorado will have tuition fees that range from $3,000 to $8,000. The longer the course, the more lab hours and higher quality of the education, the more you will pay.

Likewise, for a college or university, you will pay more. Generally, you will attend these schools when you are after an HVAC degree. Some colleges do offer diploma and certification courses, along with degree-granting courses, but the cost is about the same.

For colleges and universities, you will pay by the credit-hour. Most courses will fall between 40 and 120 credit hours, depending on the type of course (certification, associate’s, or bachelor’s degrees). You can expect to pay about $5,000 to $8,000 per year or $20,000 to $40,000 for the two degrees. Don’t forget to look into financial aid to help with these costs, too.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Colorado?

HVAC is a great career choice in almost every state. In Colorado, there is an ideal opportunity for certified technicians to earn a great wage and expand their knowledge, experience, and income over the next few years.

Colorado Entry Level HVAC Salary

For entry-level techs to those with 2 years or less experience, the average starting salary is between $18 and $23 per hour. You can expect an annual wage of about $37,437 per year, according to GlassDoor.

These wages are determined by your location as well as the size and demand of the company you work for. It also represents the level of experience and knowledge you have in the industry.

Colorado HVAC Tech Salary

For well-experienced technicians with more than 5 years on the job, your wages can exceed $60,000 per year. The top 10% of HVAC technicians in the state of Colorado report earnings over $76,000.

Again, this will be determined by the company that employs you as well as your skill and experience level. The more training you have, the more you will be offered in your wages.

Return of Investment

With the average cost of tuition and the average wage pay, the ROI is also about average compared to the rest of the country. Places like Michigan and Texas will have a higher ROI, while areas such as Florida, Arizona, and California will have a lower one.

When all is said and done, the return on your education and tool investments will have you debt-free and earning pure profit in 10 to 12 years.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Colorado

The demand for quality HVAC technicians has never been higher. With an average of 13% expected job growth over the next decade (according to the BLS), HVAC is one of the highest growth-potential markets in the country.

Emerging technologies such as green tech and solar power are pushing the industry into the next millennia while increasing demand for technicians with this technological knowledge.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

Online HVAC programs are advisable when you have difficulty reaching a physical campus. This can be due to several factors or reasons, though the most common is that the campus is too far away, or your current work schedule doesn’t align with school hours. However, keep in mind that the minimum standards for working HVAC in Colorado require exams that must be taken in person, so you can study online, but must be in person to become fully certified.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

HVAC is one of the trade skills that can be entered with little to no experience. However, this isn’t an ideal situation. If you have no experience at all with the tools and equipment, going in blind is a bad idea. Instead, it is best to look into apprenticeship programs that will take you on and teach you what you need to get a firm grasp of the concepts and repairs needed.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

There are two degrees you can obtain in the HVAC field. The associate’s degree is a standard 2-year degree which can be completed in 18 to 24 months. The bachelor’s degree is a 4-year degree that might be able to be fast-tracked based on experience and previous credit-hours, meaning you can complete the process in 36 to 48 months.

Are contractors required to be licensed in Colorado?

All contractors in Colorado must be licensed by their municipalities. Along with the ICC exams for certification, each city will have its own regulations for the certification process. You can check online or with your local city hall to find out what applications, exams, and other requirements your local area has.

How do I get a contractor’s license in Colorado?

To begin the process, you need to take and pass the specified ICC exam (there are 3 to choose from) and send in your license application. From there, each county (and possibly city) will have separate regulations and requirements for contract license approval.

What is a Class C contractor license in Colorado?

A Class C license is achieved by taking the ICC F13 exam and following other local regulations. This grants you the ability to contract work for single and double-family homes for the purposes of alteration, addition, repair, demolition, or construction. This will include your plumbing, electrical, and HVAC work.

How do I get an HVAC job in Colorado?

To get an entry-level job in Colorado as an HVAC technician, you will need to first obtain your EPA 608 certification. Once you have this certification, you are free to begin applying for work. However, without knowledge or experience, you won’t get very far. It is recommended you attend an accredited school to learn HVAC or an apprenticeship for experience. If you can do both, your chances of being hired by top companies are even better.

Conclusion

Finding the right HVAC school in Colorado will set you up with a rewarding and thorough plan for your new career. However, finding the right school for you can be a daunting adventure. There are many schools and course types to consider along the way.

Hopefully, this article was able to give you the right questions to ask when looking at schools and helped you narrow down your choices based on region, accreditation, and education quality.

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Best HVAC Schools in Minnesota, MN: Air Conditioning Training & Trade

Entering the HVAC industry in Minnesota is a fairly straightforward process. All you need is a thirst for knowledge, a love of working outdoors, and to pass a few exams.

The best way to get through the exams is to become fully certified as an HVAC technician, and with the help of this article, you can do just that. I will show you the best HVAC schools in Minnesota, along with a brief guide to help you narrow down your choices.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Minnesota

Minnesota doesn’t have any state-level requirements for tech certification. You are required by federal law to hold an EPA 608 certification, though.

You can study on your own and find a proctored exam site to take, pass, and become EPA certified. However, it is easier and better for your future career if you attend an accredited HVAC course and get that certification, along with the EPA requirements.

Because there are no certification requirements, you can study from practically anywhere. However, across the state, from Fergus Falls to Minneapolis, there are great schools. You can find some of the best HVAC schools in Rosemount, Brooklyn Park, or even in North Mankato or Hibbing.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

There are two primary paths to becoming an HVAC technician in Minnesota. The first path is to study for the EPA 608 exam, find a proctor, and take the exam. Once you pass the test, you can begin looking for work as an HVAC tech.

While this is a speedy method, it has a lot of drawbacks. First, you won’t have any experience with HVAC systems, tools, or diagnostics. Without these crucial elements, it will be extremely difficult to find gainful employment in the field.

The other method is a little longer, but it is better suited for those looking to make a career out of HVAC/R.

After you have your high school diploma or GED, you need to attend an accredited HVAC training school. This can be a trade school, college, or university. Most will offer certification programs or degrees. Others will only have HVAC training and a completion certificate once you finish the course.

During the course you can take your EPA exams, if offered. Otherwise, it is best to use school resources to find an apprenticeship or internship program. Here you will get the hands-on hours needed to become efficient with the tools and equipment of the trade in real-world situations.

Finally, you can become fully certified along with the EPA certification (if not already obtained). Plus, you will have the skills, knowledge, experience, and certifications that employers look for.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Below you will find several consideration factors that you should think about. These will help you narrow down your search and identify the school best suited for your specific needs.

Location

Where the school is located is important. You don’t want to find a school that is too far from your home or current job. This will make it difficult to get to class regularly or on time.

Close proximity is important for many factors, but it shouldn’t be the only factor you consider. Just because a school is close by doesn’t mean it is going to be an ideal fit. You may find that a school a little further down the road is a better match for your expectations.

Accredited School

The school needs to be accredited. This is a process of proving they provide a quality education that meets or exceeds specific standards and guidelines set forth by the government and accreditation bodies.

If you attend a school that is not accredited, you may find that the certificate or degree is not worth the paper it is printed on.

Offers Quality Education

Accreditation is important, but that means they meet government minimums. This doesn’t mean they are right for you.

You should visit the potential campus, have a look around and talk to current students and staff to find out if it is right for you. The atmosphere, labs, classrooms, and instructors all need to feel right to you, and any red flags shouldn’t be ignored. This includes the books and software used by the school.

Offers Hands-on Training

HVAC is a trade industry, and hands-on training is crucial. It is this reason that online certification isn’t possible. You must have a specific number of hands-on hours to become officially certified. Don’t be confused by the difference between HVAC certification and a certificate of completion.

Make sure your school has enough lab hours to teach you everything you need to know and offers the right tools and equipment to keep your education relevant in today’s changing industry.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Many schools offer post-graduate programs. These can include job placement and apprenticeship placement programs.

Each one should be used, and many offer assistance for all graduates for life. Any time you need help getting a new position, the school post-grad program office should be your first stop.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Another factor that goes mostly unrecognized is customer service. HVAC is a customer service driven industry. While you are working on machines and with electronics, you must talk to and deal with customers at their homes or places of business.

Knowing how to handle delicate situations or customers that are mad should be at the top of your list. Not every school offers a customer service portion of the program. If you don’t have prior customer service training, make sure it is offered at your chosen school.

8 Best HVAC Schools in Minnesota

In this section, you will find the best HVAC schools reviewed and compared. This list is based on region or location. Scroll through and find the best school near you.

Minneapolis, MN

1. Minneapolis Community and Technical College
1501 Hennepin Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55403

Best Choice For: Top rated HVAC school in Minnesota

Minneapolis Community and Technical CollegeMinneapolis Community and Technical College offers three courses designed to get you from the sidelines into the HVAC industry. You can choose the 18, 45, or 72 credit programs. These grant you a diploma, certificate or AAS degree (respectively). The top rated HVAC school in the state doesn’t disappoint.

With a state-of-the-art lab, enough classwork to teach you theory and customer service, and more lab hours than almost anyone else, the school has its benefits. If you are looking to start your career on the right foot or want to take a path leading to starting your own business, this is the place to start.

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2. Dunwoody College of Technology
818 Dunwoody Blvd, Minneapolis, MN 55403

Best Choice For: Runner up for best rated MN school

Dunwoody College of TechnologyIf you cannot make it to MCTC for any reason, the Dunwoody College of Technology is the second best option there is. Boasting extensive labs, small class sizes, and high job placement, you can’t go wrong.

If you are looking to become fully certified, this school is for you. With over 90% of the course taking place in the lab, you get more hands-on training than you can handle. Not to mention the excellent job placement program that sees graduates picking from an average of 15 job offers each. Your future starts right here.

Brooklyn Park, MN

3. Hennepin Technical College
9000 Brooklyn Blvd, Brooklyn Park, MN 55445

Best Choice For: Financial aid and post-grad programs

Hennepin Technical CollegeHennepin isn’t far behind the leaders on this list. Their programs allow you to work on some of the most advanced and modern systems. Their claim to fame, though, is getting you into school. With great financial aid programs and enough post-grad programs to keep you employed, there isn’t much else to do but pass the class and get hired.

You will work one on one with some of the state’s leading instructors and in a lab with the latest technologies. The degree program, as well as the diploma semester, each teach customer service as well as HVAC theory, getting you prepared for the real-world of HVAC.

Fergus Falls, MN

4. Minnesota State Community and Technical College
1414 College Way, Fergus Falls, MN 56537

Best Choice For: Continuing education options

Minnesota State Community and Technical CollegeMinnesota state has multiple campuses, and the Moorhead and Wadena campuses offer the HVAC diploma program. This course is designed to get you familiar with the tools, theory, and equipment of the HVAC trade. You will miss out on some of the more advanced classroom items, like customer service skills training, but if you already have that, you won’t miss out.

When you finish the course, you will have an HVAC diploma, but no certifications. You will need to find an EPA 608 exam testing facility, which the school will help with. The school also uses the Workforce Development Scholarship program, which can help you pay for this course.

North Mankato, MN

5. South Central College-North Mankato Campus
1920 Lee Blvd, North Mankato, MN 56003

Best Choice For: Entry-level to no experience with HVAC

South Central College-North Mankato CampusRegardless of your current level of experience, South Central College will have you ready to work in the HVAC industry in no time at all. The school offers five different courses making it one of the most advanced offerings around. You can go for the certification program and become fully certified, or the AAS degree program for continuing on to a bachelor’s degree.

The other three diploma-granting courses are made for learning from scratch or adding to your current level of experience if you are looking to move up in your company. For those wishing to start their career as a contractor, the courses here will also prep you for the state licensing requirements.

Hibbing, MN

6. Hibbing Community College
1515 E 25th St, Hibbing, MN 55746

Best Choice For: Fast-track into HVAC career

Hibbing Community CollegeHibbing Community College’s HVAC program is made for those wanting to get into the industry as soon as possible. While it isn’t a trade school 2-month course, it is a 32 credit-hour class that will give you plenty of hands-on training while teaching you theory, electrical diagnostics, and tool familiarization.

The hands-on lab work is some of the most intensive in the state, and when you are done, there won’t be a residential AC system you can’t handle. The school also offers financial aid for those that qualify and post-graduate programs to help you find the right place to start your new career.

Oakdale, MN

7. Midway Vo-Tech
1355 Geneva Ave N #102, Oakdale, MN 55128

Best Choice For: Contractor exam preparation

Midway Vo-TechWhile not technically HVAC technician related, Midway Vo-Tech offers a contractor’s prep course. If you want to start your own business that deals with plumbing, HVAC, and electrical, you will need to be licensed by the state. These exams are thorough and quite difficult.

Midway offers test prep courses for those that need to pass these exams. The HVAC portion covers heating, gas, and fuels as used in HVAC, and there are 5 test prep classes you can attend. You can also purchase the courses individually or as a bundle, whatever makes it easiest for you.

Rosemount, MN

8. Dakota County Technical College
1300 145th St E, Rosemount, MN 55068

Best Choice For: EPA 608 exam prep and testing

Dakota County Technical CollegeDakota County Technical College offers a diploma granting course covering everything you need to begin your new HVAC career. With the course, you will get a lot of hands-on training as well as a good mix of book and classwork.

The course is a 39 credit-hour class, which also qualifies for the CPL program that grants class credits on life experience. You will also prep for, take, and pass the EPA 608 certification exam prior to graduating, giving you all the tools you need when you step off campus.

HVAC Training School Costs in Minnesota

The average tuition cost for HVAC certification will cost about $5,500 per year. For a degree program, you can expect the total cost to average about $25,000 for an associate’s degree or over $40,000 for a bachelor’s.

Trade schools tend to have cheaper costs as their courses don’t last as long. You can expect to find cost ranges between $4,000 and $9,000, depending on the length of the course and if they offer certification exams or not.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Minnesota?

According to the BLS, the HVAC industry is set to experience a nationwide high of 13% growth over the next decade. In Minnesota, the increase is a little lower, about 10%, but it is still ranked in the top 10 industries in the state. This is an excellent opportunity to get into a growing and lucrative field.

Minnesota Entry Level HVAC Salary

Entry-level techs with little to no experience will find their starting wages to fall between $29,000 and $35,000 per year. With just a couple of years experience, though, this can rise to as much as $44,000.

Of course, your location, demand for technicians at the time of hire, and what company you work for will all play a role in the starting wages.

Minnesota HVAC Tech Salary

If you are a tech in Minnesota with at least 5 years of experience, you can see wages rise over $70,000 per year. The state average is just shy of $50,000, though different counties will offer more. Blue Earth and Brown counties, for example, average tech wages above $53,000.

Return of Investment

With your education and certification, you can expect to have tuition fees paid off in about 10 years. This is a little lower than the national average, making Minnesota one of the best ROI states for HVAC technicians.

You can also expand your education and become certified as a system designer, installer, or specialist. This opens up your job queries to other industries and the potential to make a lot more in annual wages.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Minnesota

The Minnesota job market has over half a million HVAC technicians in employment as of 2018. The expected growth in the state sees an average of 40,000 new jobs over the next 8 years.

This high demand for qualified technicians puts you at the forefront of the employment line when you are fully certified, educated, and experienced.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How do I get an HVAC job in Minnesota?

To get a job in HVAC within Minnesota, you need to be EPA 608 certified. This is the only requirement. However, the HVAC certification, exams, degrees, and other resources, such as apprenticeship programs are highly advised. It is much easier to get a job in the HVAC industry if you have the education and knowledge to go with your certifications.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

You can get an HVAC course certificate of completion working only online. What you cannot do, though, is pass the EPA 608 exam or the HVAC technician certification exams. These tests must be taken in person, and some require prerequisites such as lab hours or on-the-job training.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Minnesota?

There are a few places to check for the apprenticeships in your area. One method is to use job sites like Indeed. You can also check with your school. As a graduate, you may be entitled to specific placement programs that can help you get into an apprenticeship. Finally, checking the Minnesota government website will also point you in the right direction.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

While it is possible to get into HVAC with no experience in Minnesota, it isn’t a recommended path. Most employers want a balance of school and experience. The best option for meaningful employment is to attend a trade school or college, become certified, and join an apprenticeship or entry-level position.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

You can get an associate’s degree in as little as 18 months, depending on the school requirements and if you have any prior credit-hours that transfer. The full time for an associate’s degree is 24 months or 4 full semesters. For the bachelor’s degree, you can double that time, with fast-track students completing the course in as little as 36 months.

When is online HVAC programs advisable?

Online HVAC programs are advised when it isn’t feasible to attend a school in person. This may be due to your physical location, disability, or schedule that prevents attending during school hours. However, you will need to go in person to pass any certification exams as well as the EPA 608 exam, so the entire process cannot be completed online.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

A bachelor’s of science degree in HVAC is the highest degree available in the industry. There isn’t a doctorate program available, nor is there a need for one.

Conclusion

Finding the right HVAC school in Minnesota isn’t a difficult process. Most major cities and outlying areas have at least one reputable school. The trick is to find the right school for your needs.

Based on your availability, schedule, prior commitments, and expectations, the right school needs to be a priority. This article showcased the best HVAC schools in Minnesota, and hopefully you have found one or two worth investigating further.

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Best HVAC Schools in Connecticut, CT : Air Conditioning Training & Trade

Connecticut offers a unique view of skilled trades and has specific requirements for using them. When it comes to the HVAC industry, there are certifications to achieve, educations to have and knowledge to hold.

This article examines these requirements and shows you the best HVAC schools in Connecticut to make your path towards becoming a certified HVAC technician simple, stress-free, and more viable.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Connecticut

The federal regulations require that all HVAC technicians hold the EPA 608 certification to work on, with, or dispose of refrigerant. Other than this certification, each state is left to determine what their HVAC techs and contractors are required.

For Connecticut, the state mandates that all HVAC technicians hold one of several certifications. You aren’t required to have all of them but must hold at least one to be fully certified. You can choose from one of the following state certifications.

  • Licensed Apprenticeship
  • Limited Warm Air, Air Conditioning, and Refrigeration System Journeyman
  • Limited Heating, Cooling, and Piping Journeyman
  • Unlimited Heating, Cooling and Piping Journeyman
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How To Become An HVAC Technician

With the state’s license and certification requirements, there is really only one viable path to HVAC certification in Connecticut.

First, you need to obtain your high school diploma or GED. From here, you should attend a trade school or college to learn HVAC theory, mathematics, equipment, and tools. Using certification books, lab work, and even HVAC software, you can complete the schooling ready for an apprenticeship.

Once you apply for and are approved for an apprenticeship, you can learn hands-on working in the field on real systems. During this time, you should become EPA 608 certified and get accustomed to working in the HVAC industry.

By the time your apprenticeship ends, you can take the state required exams for licensing, and when you pass, you are fully certified, ready to begin your career in HVAC.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Here, you will find a brief guide explaining what to look for when choosing the ideal HVAC school near you.

Location

The location of the school is important. You don’t want to pay and attempt to attend a school that is on the other side of the state. Being close allows you a better opportunity to attend class regularly and on time.

However, this shouldn’t be the only deciding factor. You may find a better fit a few extra miles up the road. You should, though, begin your search as close to home as possible.

Accredited School

School accreditation is also crucial. If the school isn’t accredited through one of the governing bodies, then the education and tuition fees may be wasted. Many credits and continuing education opportunities are denied if your credits come from a school that isn’t accredited.

It is also possible that potential employers will deny your application because your education wasn’t from an accredited institution.

Offers Quality Education

Quality education is the most important. How the school instructs its students, interacts with the technologies, and handles the job market all make or break your career. Everything from financial aid to post-graduate programs all work together to get you the best education possible.

You should make a point to visit the campuses on your shortlist. Talk to faculty and staff and find out how they feel about the school and education system. Find out if that campus is a good fit for you before you apply or enroll.

Offers Hands-on Training

A critical aspect of schooling is a hands-on approach. Being a skilled trade, HVAC work requires tools and knowledge of the equipment. These are things you cannot get out of a book. You need to work with the tools in your hands, know how to read them, and use them to diagnose and repair the HVAC systems accurately.

Ensure your chosen school has plenty of lab hours for hands-on training.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

One other thing that is more important in Connecticut than a lot of other states is the post-graduate programs. Job placement is nice, but for Connecticut certification, you should look into applying for apprenticeships.

Most schools will have contacts in the apprenticeship and internship worlds. Being able to take advantage of these contacts is something that you should heavily invest in.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Customer service is an often overlooked part of the HVAC trade. If you don’t have prior customer service training, you should ensure that the school offers a portion of the course to customer service.

8 Best HVAC Schools in Connecticut

Below, you will find the best HVAC schools in Connecticut. Each one reviewed and compared to help you make a final decision.  Scroll through the various regions and find the perfect school for your needs.

East Windsor, CT

1. Lincoln Technical Institute
97 Newberry Rd, East Windsor, CT 06088

Best Choice For: Complete education and exam prep

Lincoln College of TechnologyLincoln Technical Institute is one of the nations leading trade schools, and the campus in East Windsor is one of the best. Their graduates make up over 20% of all hired HVAC techs in the state, and they accommodate students from all over the nation.

With on-campus housing, the students can participate in one of the most immersive and thorough HVAC courses available. The lab hours are tremendous, and you get one on one training from industry-leading instructors. No corners are cuts here, and you will graduate ready to take on the state certifications and begin your career.

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Plainville, CT

2. Construction Education Center
35A, Robert Jackson Way, Plainville, CT 06062

Best Choice For: Direct apprenticeship training

Construction Education CenterFor D2 and S2 (tech and journeymen, respectively) licensees, the CEC is where you want to be. They offer a 2-year (tech) and 4-year (journeyman) program that meets all state requirements for license hours., Each program is designed to give you the education needed to perform the duties and the hands-on hours required for certification.

This immersive program loads the students with work, experience, and real-life scenarios to get you ready for the challenges you will face in the real world. By the time you graduate, there won’t be an HVAC system made that causes you difficulty. Plus, you will have all the required hours for the state-level licenses so you can start work right away.

Milford, CT

3. Platt Technical High School
600 Orange Ave, Milford, CT 06461

Best Choice For: High school students wanting a career in HVAC

Platt Technical High SchoolThe Platt Tech high school is designed to give 4-year high school students a leg up in the HVAC industry. Worth 3 credits each of the 4 years of high school, the program introduces HVAC theory, mathematics, and installation of systems.

The student qualifies for apprenticeship programs upon graduation and can begin their career directly out of high school. For those that know what they want when they enter 9th grade, Platt Tech is an excellent start in a career that will continue to grow for the foreseeable future.

Stratford, CT

4. Porter and Chester Institute
670 Lordship Blvd, Stratford, CT 06615

Best Choice For: Customer service in HVAC training

Porter and Chester InstituteThe Porter and Chester Institute has an HVAC program designed for those with no knowledge and that want to make the most out of their efforts. The 1-year program will have you prepped and ready for all required exams and licenses.

More than other schools, PCI also tailors their curriculum towards the customer. With customer service and professionalism classes, you will know how to handle yourself in the field when dealing with equipment and people.

Waterbury, CT

Best Choice For: Exam prep training

Industrial Management & Training Institute (IMTI)IMTI offers training for S-2, D-2, and EPA 608 certification exams. Each course is a full review of all required elements in the HVAC industry for technicians and journeymen alike. If you plan to work in the HVAC industry in Connecticut and don’t want to attend a college or trade school, or if you already have experience from another state, IMTI is ideal for you.

The courses basically teach the tests. Here you should already know the HVAC industry and are not looking for the basics of a traditional course. Graduating from each course will offer you the best chance of passing the state license requirement exams as well as the EPA certification exam.

Cromwell, CT

6. Entech Advanced Energy Training
10 Alcap Ridge, Cromwell, CT 06416

Best Choice For: Seamless transition from school to employment

Entech Advanced Energy TrainingEntech Advanced Energy Training offers an HVAC course designed to see you finish with your state S-2 license. The full time, 6-month course teaches you everything you need to know about HVAC with state of the art labs and plenty of hands-on training.

Once the course is over, you are placed in the state apprenticeship program to complete your 8,000 hours of training on the job. The end result is a fully certified and licensed technician ready for employment with any company in the country.

Bristol, CT

7. Bristol Technical Education Center
431 Minor Rd, Bristol, CT 06010

Best Choice For: Complete HVAC training

Bristol Technical Education CenterBristol Tech brings you a 2-year intensive HVAC training course made for those that want to push themselves to become the best HVAC tech they can be. This course covers all of the HVAC industry aspects, from customer service to diagnostics, repair, or installation.

You also get training in pipefitting, sheet metal work, and HVAC installation that is rivaled by few. When you complete the course, you are ready for your state exams and full-time employment anywhere in the state.

New Britain, CT

8. E C Goodwin Technical High School
735 Slater Rd, New Britain, CT 06053

Best Choice For: High school aged certification and training

E C Goodwin Technical High SchoolLike the Platt High School listed above, E C Goodwin also offers a 12-credit, 4-year HVAC course. This one, too, is designed to get high school students interested in an HVAC career-ready for full-time employment.

This course works towards full understanding as well as certification, where you also finish with an OSHA 30 certificate and NATE certification. All that’s left is the EPA 608 (which can be taken senior year) and the apprenticeship hours required by the state.

HVAC Training School Costs in Connecticut

Connecticut follows the national average of tuition fees when it comes to trade schools, colleges, and universities. That average will see the HVAC certification and degree programs range in cost from $4,000 to $40,000.

Trade schools will cost less as they are generally shorter and can have you completed in a few months. You will pay the tuition and book fees, of course, but most trade schools will range in price from $4,000 to $7,000.

Colleges, on the other hand, charge by the credit-hour. This means your cost per semester can vary from $3,000 to $5,000. Depending on any current credits you hold or obtained at other schools, your total cost for a degree can range from $20,000 to $40,000.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Connecticut?

HVAC is an ideal career choice in any state. The projected growth of 13% nationwide is a testament to the need for qualified techs now and in the future.

In Connecticut, that need will see an average of about 45,000 new jobs in the next 8 to 10 years. Now is a great time to enter the lucrative HVAC career field.

Connecticut Entry Level HVAC Salary

Entry-level techs that are fully certified with the state and EPA requirements will see wages fall between $28 and $38 per hour. This will depend on where you are working as well as who you are working for.

Anyone with less than 2-years experience and all the required certifications can easily make a livable wage without much effort.

Connecticut HVAC Tech Salary

For experienced technicians with at least 5 years in the field can expect higher wages. The average for the state is about $51,200, with certain regions offering more or less.

The technician in these areas, though, can expect annual salaries between $50,00 and $64,000. Well experienced techs working for notable companies can even earn yearly salaries, with benefits and bonuses that exceed $78,000.

Return of Investment

The starting and experienced wages make the investment in schooling and certifications well worth it. Unlike many other industries with similar tuition costs, HVAC is poised to break out in the next few years.

With solar and green technologies leading the way, the need for qualified technicians means the wages and demand will outweigh the costs by a large margin.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Connecticut

The HVAC demand is only going to increase. With technological advances in the green or environmentally-friendly field and solar and other renewable energies making an impact, Connecticut will see a surge in the HVAC industry.

While the nation expects a growth of 13% on average, Connecticut, much like Michigan, exceeds this percentage with growth expectations nearing 15 to 18% over the next decade.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How do I get an HVAC job in Connecticut?

Getting an HVAC job in Connecticut requires a state license as well as full certification. The EPA 608 certification, HVAC tech certification, and at least 1 of the state licenses are needed to work in the industry. By finishing an accredited school program and entering an apprenticeship, you will get the experience, knowledge, and certifications needed to go out on your own.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

No. Connecticut requires certifications and licenses that must meet minimum standards. Part of those standards are classroom work (which can be completed online) along with lab and apprenticeship hours that must be done in person.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Connecticut?

As apprenticeships are a requirement in Connecticut, there are several programs available to you. You can check on job listing sites, or through the apprenticeship program site within the state’s database system online.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

In Connecticut, it is almost impossible, though not unheard of, to get into the HVAC industry with no experience. You can enter the apprenticeship programs or schooling aspects of the industry without any experience, but Connecticut will not allow you to begin working without the required licenses.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

You can attend a college or university for one of two degree programs. The associate’s degree is a 2-year degree program that can be completed between 18 and 24 months. The bachelor’s degree program will take you between 36 and 48 months to complete.

When is online HVAC programs advisable?

Online learning is ideal for those that cannot easily get to a school campus for in-person learning. You can use online courses to complete the required class and bookwork portions of the courses. However, lab, hands-on, and exams must be completed in person.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

A bachelor’s degree in HVAC/R (BAS) is the highest available HVAC degree in any state, Connecticut included.

Conclusion

Finding the right school in Connecticut for HVAC certification can be daunting. There are plenty of schools that teach you what you need to know, but fewer that take the required steps to see you fully certified.

With state requirements in certification and licensing, you need to find the perfect school that delivers everything you need. Hopefully, this article showed you what to look for when making your decision and helped you find a school that will work for your needs.

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Best HVAC Schools in New Jersey, NJ : Air Conditioning Training & Trade

New Jersey has one of the most volatile climates in the US. With average annual temperatures hovering around 60 degrees (F), the winters easily see temperature drops in the teens, and summers can exceed 90. The HVAC industry is always on its toes.

Now is the best time to get into the rewarding HVAC industry. This article will show you the best HVAC schools in New Jersey and explain exactly what to look for when making your choice.

HVAC Certification Requirements in New Jersey

The state of New Jersey does not have any HVAC technician certification requirements. This means that as soon as you complete the federal requirements, you are free to begin work. However, it is wise to attend an apprenticeship or HVAC school and aim for full certification to help you stand out to employers.

Within the state are many cities, towns, and regions where it is ideal for studying HVAC certification. This list includes the likes of Union, Hazlet, Blackwood, West Windsor, Wayne, Scotch Plains, and of course, Nutely and Middletown.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

Since New Jersey doesn’t have certification requirements, there are a few paths you can take to become an HVAC technician.

The first path is the easiest, though the least profitable. Simply take and pass the EPA 608 certification exam and begin putting out your resume.

You are most likely not to be hired in this manner, though. Instead, you can try the second option. Join an HVAC internship or apprenticeship. Even with little or no experience you can get into the industry, learn the trade, and take the EPA exam along the way. Once completed, you will be more employable, based on the experience alone.

The best route is also the longest. After gaining your high school diploma or GED, you should then continue on to an accredited HVAC trade school, community college, or university. Here you can learn HVAC theory, customer service, and other necessary elements of the job.

From there, you enter an apprenticeship program to get more hands-on training, take the EPA exam, and gain professional certification. Employers will line up for these prospects and also tend to pay higher starting wages.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Below, you will find a brief guide of consideration factors for choosing the right school for you. Make sure you plan ahead and don’t just pay for the first school you come across.

Location

Location matters. Being close to the campus will ensure that you can readily attend classes and get to class on time. If traffic or your schedule makes getting to class difficult, finding a school close to your home or current worksite may be the best choice.

The physical location of the school isn’t everything, though, and if there is a better fit in a school a few more miles away, you may choose the further one.

Accredited School

Attending an accredited school is highly important. There are several reasons, but the simple explanation is that non-accredited schools don’t have credits that transfer should you decide to continue your education.

Employers are also less likely to accept your level of knowledge or experience from a school that isn’t accredited. To avoid wasting your money on an education you can’t do anything with, make sure the school you attend is accredited.

Offers Quality Education

The level of education is counted in many factors. This includes the lab work and classwork, of course, but it also includes the type of HVAC books being taught from. It can even mean the type of HVAC software the school uses to teach the students.

One of the best methods to determine if the school is a good fit for you is to visit the campus. Talk to the students and staff and find out how things are getting on. If the students and staff match the atmosphere of the school, it is probably a good fit for you.

Offers Hands-on Training

HVAC is a skilled trade, and it takes a lot of hands-on training. With all the diagnostics, parts, equipment, and tools needed to be successful, you need lab time to learn them all.

Make sure the school you choose to pay and attend offers plenty of hands-on training in the lab and less time in the classroom.

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

Post-graduate programs are essential. If you plan to continue your education with an apprenticeship or internship, find out if the school offers these placement programs for you to take advantage of.

They may also offer job placement programs, which is worth a check. If so, most of the post-grad programs are for life, so you can use them any time you need.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

HVAC field techs deal with customers on a daily basis. It is crucial to have great customer service skills. A lot of schools have a customer service portion of their program, but some do not. If you don’t have any prior customer service experience, make sure the school you choose offers this as part of the course.

8 Best HVAC Schools in New Jersey

Here you will find the best HVAC schools across New Jersey. Scroll through and find your region or local areas and see which schools made the cut.

Union, NJ

1. Lincoln Technical Institute
2299 Vauxhall Rd, Union, NJ 07083

Best Choice For: Future technologies learning

Lincoln College of TechnologyLincoln Technical Institute is a well awarded, highly-touted school for HVAC training. The school has multiple programs designed to get you everything you need for your new, rewarding career. The class itself offers you plenty of hands-on training in a state of the art facility. You will work on the newest and most modern systems around.

If you have trouble getting to campus, they also offer a shuttle service for many outlying areas. On top of that, the school also teaches green technology in the HVAC industry with mast technicians as instructors. It is the most well-rounded and future-proof HVAC education you can get.

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Hazlet, NJ

Best Choice For: Comprehensive apprenticeship

United Association of New Jersey Air Conditioning & Refrigeration DivisionIf you are ready to commit yourself and take the first step to a secure future, then the UANJ is where you go. They offer training for journeyman technicians that is both rewarding and difficult. Their biggest claim, though, is the apprenticeship program.

A program dating back some 60 years, this 5-year program puts you on the job and in the classroom with 1,800 hours per year for 5 years. Once complete, you will be a journeyman HVAC technician with nothing but desire and goals ahead of you.

Blackwood, NJ

3. Pennco Tech
99 Erial Rd, Blackwood, NJ 08012

Best Choice For: Complete HVAC education

Pennco TechPennco Tech offers a flexible scheduled program designed to meet your needs. With a comprehensive course that takes you from book and software learning directly to the lab, you will find that you get the best of your education from this school.

Leaving nothing to chance, you are taken through every HVAC aspect, from theory and application to diagnostics, installation, and repair. Upon course completion, you will be an exam away from full certification as an HVAC technician.

West Windsor Township, NJ

4. Mercer County Community College
1200 Old Trenton Rd, West Windsor Township, NJ 08550

Best Choice For: Associate’s degree in HVAC

Mercer County Community CollegeAs part of the MC trade school program, Mercer County Community College offers a continuing education HVAC course. This course is designed for those looking to take the next step in their career and enter a supervisory or management position.

The 60 credit AAS degree program has financial aid, job placement, and apprenticeship programs to assist you in getting to that next step. The course works mainly in the classroom with theory, mathematics, and advanced technology standards. Upon graduation, you are poised to start your own business or take over management responsibilities in your current employ.

Wayne, NJ

5. Fortis Institute
201 Willowbrook Blvd, Wayne, NJ 07470

Best Choice For: Job placement opportunities

Fortis CollegeThe Fortis Institute has campuses all across America. In Wayne, NJ, you will learn how to use tools and equipment to diagnose, repair, and install modern HVAC systems. The class offers plenty of hands-on lab hours so you become familiar with everything.

You also learn HVAC theory and touch on thermodynamics as it pertains to heating and cooling. Upon graduation, you can begin working with some of the most prominent companies in the area through the school’s job placement programs.

Ramsey, NJ

6. Eastwick College – Ramsey
10 S Franklin Turnpike, Ramsey, NJ 07446

Best Choice For: Multiple campus options

Eastwick College – RamseyEastwick College offers you a 12-month program designed to have you prepared and ready for a rewarding career. The diploma-granting course covers all of the basic (and advanced) classroom things, such as HVAC theory and future technologies (solar, green, etc.).

If Ramsey is too far, you can also get the same education through the Nutely campus. It also has the same 12-month diploma program. At either campus, you will graduate ready to take your EPA 608 exam and find placement with a company that seeks out Eastwick graduates, and there are a lot of them.

Toms River, NJ

7. Ocean County Vocational Technical School
137 Bey Lea Rd, Toms River, NJ 08753

Best Choice For: Complete learning and apprenticeship preparation

Ocean County Vocational Technical SchoolOcean County Vocational offers a 2-year program that is made to get you ahead of the curve. The commitment doesn’t grant you a 2-year degree, but instead uses the continuing education program to give you 2-year status with the HVAC apprenticeship program.

This 900 hour course teaches you the tools and equipment, along with installation, repair, and customer service in the lab, for the first year. The second year also has lab hours but is geared more towards the book learning side, with theory, mathematics, and the HVAC evolution in the near future.

Scotch Plains, NJ

8. UCTech
1776 Raritan Rd, Scotch Plains, NJ 07076

Best Choice For: Fast track to HVAC career start

UCTechAs a post-secondary or adult education facility, UCTech offers an HVAC course that is designed to get you familiar with repair, diagnostics, and installation of HVAC systems. You will learn the tools and equipment working hands-on in the lab.

The classroom will cover theory and thermodynamics, which assists you in getting that ideal job in the HVAC industry. Upon course completion, you can take and pass your EPA 608 exam and begin using school resources for job or apprenticeship placement.

HVAC Training School Costs in New Jersey

The cost of HVAC training in New Jersey will vary greatly. The final costs of tuition are determined by the type of school you attend, as well as the region of New Jersey and the level of education you are after.

Trade schools can last a few weeks to several months and, on average, have a tuition cost between $2,500 and $8,000. The higher costs will generally include all certification exams and other program factors that make the price reasonable.

If you are looking to further your career or want to start your own contractor business, you may want to attend a 2 or 4 year college. Getting an HVAC degree can help you stand out, but it will cost more.

Each school will charge by the credit-hour, and each will have different requirements for graduation though you can expect to pay about $5,000 per year, which equals $20,000 to $40,000 for an associate’s or bachelor’s degree in HVAC.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in New Jersey?

The HVAC industry is alive and thriving in New Jersey. According to the BLS, HVAC as a whole is expected to grow 13% by 2028, and this leads almost all trade professions. Getting in now will secure your place in this rewarding career, and in New Jersey, you are poised to make a highly desirable wage.

New Jersey Entry Level HVAC Salary

Entry-level technicians in New Jersey can easily expect wages to top $40,000 per year. Most educated and certified technicians have little trouble finding full-time employment, and the demand will only increase.

With just a couple of years of experience, the annual wage can range from $46,000 to $53,000.

New Jersey HVAC Tech Salary

For experienced technicians with 5 or more years under their belt, you can expect wages to increase as well. This, of course, will depend on the company you work for, if you have continued your education and the region of New Jersey you work in.

According to salary.com, though, the average wage across the state for experienced techs is $52,388 per year. The top 10% reach wages that surpass $66,000, and some companies reward their long-term technicians with bonuses, overtime, and raises that can equate to well over $80,000.

Return of Investment

With the average cost of tuition and the wage potential for HVAC techs, the ROI is quite high. Student debts are quickly paid off, on average, in less than 10 years (the national average is between 15 and 18 years).

Because of the demand and job type, there are other opportunities, as well. These include specializing, HVAC design, and working in future technologies like solar and green HVAC industries.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in New Jersey

HVAC is expected to grow across the nation by 13%. This is the same number as New Jersey, that with few exceptions, leads the country. Michigan, Texas and Arizona are slightly higher, but in New Jersey, the number of expected jobs over the next 10 years should see at least 400,000.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How do I get an HVAC job in New Jersey?

The only state requirement for HVAC technicians is the EPA 608 exam certification. Once you have this, you can legally work on HVAC systems. However, it is recommended that you at least attend an apprenticeship or trade school, so you get a full understanding of what you are doing.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

You can get a certification of completion doing online courses. However, an actual HVAC tech certification requires you to complete lab hours and take exams that can only be done in person. The EPA 608 exam, for example, requires a professional proctor and in-person exam at specific locations. These can be studied for online but must be taken in person.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in New Jersey?

There are plenty of apprenticeship programs in New Jersey. You can search job sites like Indeed for specific listings, or take advantage of your school’s post-graduate programs to find and apply for apprenticeships any time during or after course completion.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

In New Jersey it is possible to get into the HVAC industry without any prior experience. While it isn’t recommended and is a much tougher task getting hired, it can be done. If you cannot attend school or an apprenticeship for any reason, it doesn’t have to stop you. If you can find someone willing to take you on with only your EPA 608 certification, you can start your new career right away.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

The average time for an associate’s degree in HVAC is 18 to 24 months. For a bachelor’s degree, you are looking at 36-48 months. The ranges are determined by the length of the course offered by the school, plus any existing and transferable credits you may already possess.

When is online HVAC programs advisable?

Online study is always advisable. However, if you plan to become fully certified, you need to attend classes in person. If this isn’t a feasible answer, you can begin learning online and make it to a school or lab when able.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

The highest form of official degree in the HVAC industry is the bachelor’s degree.

Conclusion

Choosing the best HVAC school in New Jersey can be overwhelming. With so many options and requirements, the task of finding the perfect school can easily get frustrating. This article is geared towards showing you what is required on your part and how to identify the ideal school.

With any luck, you found a school that was close to you and offered enough hands-on training, customer service skills, and the needed tools to start your new HVAC career off on the right foot.

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Best HVAC Schools in Philadelphia, PA: Air Conditioning Training & Trade

Becoming an HVAC technician in Philadelphia is a straightforward process. Getting hired as an HVAC tech, though, is a different story. With prominent job growth and an average of 40,000 new jobs expected in the next 10 years, you need to stand out.

This article will examine the process of becoming a certified HVAC technician and covers the best HVAC schools in Philadelphia, PA, so that you can get to the head of the hiring line. Find your stand out school on this list and get ready for your new career.

HVAC Certification Requirements in Philadelphia

The state of Pennsylvania doesn’t have any requirements for certification of HVAC technicians. However, all techs are required by federal law to become EPA 608 certified.

If you plan to be a contractor or start your own HVAC business, though, you are subject to PA’s contractor license requirements. As for the technicians, though, there aren’t any more stringing requirements.

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How To Become An HVAC Technician

In Philly, there are a few paths you can take to become an HVAC technician. The most straightforward path is to study for and pass the EPA 608 certification exam. From there, you are essentially capable of being hired and working in the HVAC industry.

However, this is a bad path unless your job is only partially HVAC involved (maintenance, for example) and where you won’t use the HVAC skills on a daily basis. Most employers will need some experience, either on the job, an apprenticeship, or schooling.

The best path is to get your high school diploma or GED. From there, you want to attend an accredited trade school, college, or university in their HVAC training program.

During the course, you will get all the training, theory, fundamentals, and hands-on lab training. You can earn a degree or certification as well. Once the course is complete, you can (optionally) join an apprenticeship or internship while working on your EPA 608 certification.

After all of this is completed (average 1 to 4 years), you can join the workforce as a fully certified HVAC technician with at least 1 or 2 years experience, thus increasing your chances of being hired and earning a higher wage than other candidates.

Quick Guide in Choosing Your HVAC School

Choosing the right school is more than just the books they use or the HVAC software they have on the computers. Below, you will find several factors to consider when looking at schools to help you make an informed decision.

Location

Where the school is located is going to be a top factor to consider. You won’t want to enroll in a school on the other side of the state. But locally, there may be a few schools worth considering.

In these instances, finding the one that is easiest to get to based on your schedule, traffic, and other factors might be the final detail that chooses for you.

Likewise, just because the school is located right next door, doesn’t mean it is a better option than the one a few miles away.

Accredited School

Accreditation is important for your continuing education and validity of the diploma, degree, or certifications. Non-accredited schools are not accepted by a lot of employers and certainly not by accredited schools when you are looking for credit transfers.

Accreditation is something the school has to go through and prove the validity and quality of its education system. If they cannot, they don’t get accredited. If you attend a non-accredited school, you may only succeed in spending money that gets you nowhere.

Offers Quality Education

Other factors of quality education, aside from accreditation, are determined by how the school feels to you. The best option is to visit the campus in person and talk to people. Speaking to the staff and instructors will give you a feel of what the school is about and how well they pay attention to their students.

Talking to current students will also let you know how the program is, if it is well-liked or if it feels like a waste. No matter what happens, you will walk away knowing if that school is one you will enjoy being a part of, or not.

Offers Hands-on Training

Hands-on training is crucial for the prospective HVAC tech. You need to know the parts of the systems you are working on, how to take them apart, install them, or repair them. You also need to know how to use the tools in your tool belt properly.

If the school doesn’t offer enough lab hours, you may want to consider a different school. The bulk of your learning should come in the lab, not from a book (though the books are important, too).

Connects you to an Apprenticeship/Internship Program

One of the best features of a lot of trade schools and colleges is their post-graduate programs. These often include job placement or apprenticeship placement programs. Through these, you can have the school do the leg work for finding your apprenticeship and helping you with the application.

These programs are generally for life for the graduate, so you can use them any time you need help with a new job or finding another company to apply through.

Offers Customer Service Skills Training

Customer service is a massive part of the HVAC work. Dealing with customers daily is the heart of the tech’s job. You need to know how to handle someone that is upset that their system is broken. You also need to know how to listen to them and explain your findings.

If you do not have prior customer service experience, make sure that the school you sign up for has a class or two on customer service training.

3 Best HVAC Schools in Philadelphia, PA

Here you will find the best HVAC schools in Philly. Scroll through to find the one closest to your neighborhood and see if it is an ideal match for your needs.

Philadelphia, PA

1. Orleans Technical College
2770 Red Lion Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19114

Best Choice For: Insertion into the HVAC industry upon graduation

Orleans Technical CollegeOrleans Tech features two classes to fit your schedule. The full-time day class runs for 6 months. You are expected to attend all classes as this is an intensive hands-on class. For those with day jobs or other obligations, there is a 13 month evening class that is also intensive in the lab.

You won’t spend a lot of time learning theory or future technologies, but you will know about all of the tools and work on the most modern systems on the market today. By the time you earn your diploma from Orleans, you will be ready to pass the EPA 608 exam. They also offer job placement to all graduates.

2. Lincoln Technical Institute
9191 Torresdale Ave, Philadelphia, PA 19136

Best Choice For: Complete HVAC education and certification

Lincoln College of TechnologyLincoln Technical Institute is one of the largest HVAC schools in the country. They have campuses in multiple states and take part in a lot of grant and scholarship programs too. They even have space on campus to live, if you plan to come from out of state or further away.

The course is all-inclusive and covers everything from solar technologies to mathematical theory. The lab work takes you through every possible situation to help you diagnose, repair, and install HVAC systems. Graduation places you among the 90% that find work right away.

3. UA Local 420 Steamfitters Joint Apprenticeship
14420 Townsend Rd, Philadelphia, PA 19154

Best Choice For: HVAC Master Technician training and journeyman advancement

The local UA 420 offers journeyman training for pipe fitting sheet metal and HVAC. This apprenticeship program is all-inclusive but does take a few years. In that time, you are expected to attend the weekly classroom sessions as well as 1,800 hands-on hours in the field under the direct supervision of a master technician.

The training is intensive, and your commitment will mean a solid foundation to build your new career. Of course, there are union dues and fees, but you will be part of a group that sees to it you are always employed and does everything they can to further your career.

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HVAC Training School Costs in Philadelphia

School costs in Philly are about average with the rest of the country. In terms of trade schools, community colleges, and standard universities. The costs for tuition vary widely, though, between the school types.

In general, trade schools are shorter and don’t offer the variety of required classes like English and Biology that the colleges may require. For this reason, they also cost less since there is less to teach. You can expect to pay between $4,000 and $7,500 for a trade school, based on location, size of the school, and duration of the course.

2-year degrees will range between $4,000 and $8,000 per semester, while 4-year degrees can reach $10,000 per semester. For colleges and universities, the costs will usually range between $20,000 and $40,000.

Is HVAC a Good Career Choice in Philadelphia?

HVAC is a great career choice in Philadelphia. The growing number of expected jobs puts HVAC at the top of most industry lists. That, along with the future change to solar and green technologies, means techs will be in demand for quite some time. The wages earned will reflect that demand.

Philadelphia Entry Level HVAC Salary

Entry-level technicians can expect to earn between $21 and $25 per hour until they have some work experience. While real-world experience and school will count towards getting the job, most real raises won’t happen for a couple of years.

Philadelphia HVAC Tech Salary

For experienced technicians, especially those with 5 or more years under their belt, the wages will rise fairly drastically. Philly averages about 12% higher wages for HVAC techs with experience (according to GlassDoor) than the national average.

Many techs can expect annual salaries to reach between $42 and $64,000 per year. Well experienced technicians with higher levels of education even report wage earnings over $70,000 per year.

Return of Investment

The ROI of the tuition, fees, certification exam costs, tools, and other fees is quite high compared to other states. Most HVAC techs can be debt-free in about 8 years (self-supporting, living alone).

With all things considered, Philly has a great return on investment for the trade, and with the great salaries, it is no wonder so many want to enter this rewarding and lucrative career.

Demand for HVAC Jobs in Philadelphia

The national growth rate, according to the BLS, is about 13% through 2028. With newer technologies emerging sooner than most planned on, this number is expected to rise. Nationwide we expect to see over 360,000 new HVAC jobs per year.

In Philadelphia, the growth rate is about the same as the national average and expects to see about 40,000 jobs open each year. This includes new positions, replacement positions for retirees, and other job openings.

People Also Ask (FAQ)

How do I get an HVAC job in Philadelphia?

To get a job in the HVAC industry in Philadelphia, you need to pass the EPA 608 exam. There are no other state requirements. However, hands-on training, lab work, and apprenticeships are highly recommended to make a better chance for your application to be taken seriously.

Can I get an HVAC certification license online?

You can attend online classes, but these only cover the class and book work. While there are 3-D simulated labs, they don’t count towards the certification process. Hands-on training and exams for certification must be done in person.

Are there HVAC apprenticeships in Philadelphia?

There are several apprenticeship programs in Philly. You should check job listing sites like careerbuilder.com or use your school’s post-graduate programs to help get you placed in an appropriate apprenticeship or internship.

Can I get into HVAC with no experience?

You can enter the HVAC industry with little to no experience. It is much more difficult this way, of course, but can be done. It is better to attend a trade school or apprenticeship to get hands-on knowledge before applying, though, to better your chances of being hired.

How long does it take to get a degree in HVAC?

An associate’s degree will take you between 18 and 24 months to obtain. Double that (36 to 48 months) for a bachelor’s degree.

When is online HVAC programs advisable?

Online programs are advisable to help you study for certification exams or to get the classroom work out of the way before you head to the lab for hands-on training. If you have difficulty making it to school, or the school is closed for a period due to an unforeseen situation (natural disaster, state of emergency, etc.), you may find online courses are your only option for a while.

What is the highest HVAC degree?

The highest degree you can obtain in the HVAC world is a bachelor’s degree. There isn’t a doctoral program available for HVAC, though some doctorates in engineering do touch on HVAC technologies.

Conclusion

The best HVAC school in Philadelphia, PA, is the one that fits you best. This may be based on location, the total number of lab hours, or the fact they approved your request for financial aid.

Whatever the reason, I hope this article has helped you know what to look for in a quality HVAC school and narrowed your search for that one, true fit.

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